DUI Patrols Gearing Up for Night of 1,000 Stars

first_imgSubmitted by Washington State PatrolThis Friday, December 12, 2014, marks the 24th year that law enforcement in Washington have conducted “Night of 1,000 Stars” impaired driving patrols.  This special patrol serves 2 purposes: to increase traffic safety efforts during the holiday season, and to remember officers who have fallen in the line of duty.  The “1,000 Stars” symbolizes the badges of the many officers who are out keeping the roadways safe during this weekend.  State, County, City, and Tribal law enforcement will work together to patrol Thurston County, targeting impaired driving.Kicking off the DUI patrols is a special awards ceremony, honoring officers who have shown exceptional support and performance on traffic safety activities in 2014.  These individuals have gone above and beyond to make the roadways safer in Thurston County.  DUI patrols will be conducted through the holiday season, in an effort to remove impaired drivers from the roads and keep Thurston County on track to reaching Target Zero. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week

first_imgFacebook57Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Adopt-A-Pet of SheltonCasey is the Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week.Meet Casey.  He’s a handsome young boy and about 2 years old. Casey is an energetic guy who loves to run and play. He enjoys his daily walks and his time in the play yards. Casey responds well to basic obedience commands and is very attentive.He is treat motivated so he should be very easy to train if you have specific training in mind. When you’re not out walking with Casey, he will be relaxing quietly at your feet. Casey is a very affectionate boy and will want to be with you whenever he can.We have lots of great dogs and always need volunteers to help them.  Contact Adopt-A-Pet dog shelter on Jensen Road in Shelton at www.adoptapet-wa.org or contact us at thedoghouse3091@hotmail.com or (360) 432-3091.last_img read more

Lacey City Council Seeks Applicants for TC Media Board

first_imgFacebook10Tweet0Pin0Submitted by City of LaceyThe Lacey City Council is recruiting for one vacancy on the Thurston Community Media (TC Media) Board.The TC Media Board sets policy for Thurston Community Media to assist residents and organizations to communicate information and exchange ideas through the medium of community access television. Board members serve three-year terms with no term limits. The TC Media Board meets on the last Thursday of the month at 6:00 p.m. in TC Media studio A. Applicants must live in the City of Lacey or in Lacey’s Urban Growth Area (UGA).For more information or to get an application, contact Livia Romero at (360) 413-4387 or lromero@ci.lacey.wa.us. You can also download an application at ci.lacey.wa.us.last_img read more

Real reason why the NCA refused to conduct a fitness test for Jasprit Bumrah…

first_imgAdvertisement 1qmNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs56ozsmWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E95l( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) u5jdWould you ever consider trying this?😱ad8Can your students do this? 🌚7jlalnRoller skating! Powered by Firework NCA’s refusal at conducting a fitness test for the speedster, Jasprit Bumrah has been making headlines for the last few weeks. Apparently, India team’s fast bowler wanted the NCA to conduct a fitness test for him and declare him fit, but the NCA refused to do it. Questions have been directed at the Director of National Cricket Academy (NCA), Rahul Dravid, but he has not opened about the issue yet. But another source has come out into the open and shed some light into Bumrah’s case.Advertisement The source, he wanted to remain anonymous, claimed that Rahul had no problem conducting a fitness test for the young cricketer, Jasprit Bumrah; he had instead told him to bring his physiotherapist from the India team to conduct the test at the NCA. The problem was not in conducting the test but the consequences that the NCA would have to face later on. Bumrah was allowed to use all the facilities at the NCA, but Dravid denied his request of a recruiting the NCA staff to conduct his fitness test. Since Bumrah was treated by a different physiotherapist in the India team, his case was not known to the NCA staff. None of the staff had worked with him prior to the injury or immediately after the injury, so they were not at the position to conduct a test at the very last minute and declare him fit. IF he gets injured again in the same place, then the NCA and Rahul Dravid will be blamed.Advertisement “He was told to get whoever he wanted and do the test here. Last-minute, you land up and ask us to conduct fitness test (but) how can we? Nobody knows his case. NCA trainers have not trained with him even one day, they have not treated him for four months. How can they be asked to conduct the test? Please don’t recruit the NCA staff to give the test and pass you. Because what happens is if something goes wrong, again the NCA will be blamed. No professional will agree to do this,” he said.The NCA has been blamed before for declaring Hardik Pandey fit to play in the Test Series last year. The source further revealed the NCA’s physiotherapy department was pressured from the top to make such a declaration.Advertisement Sony Sports Weekly Listings | 23rd December to 29th December 2019 Advertisementlast_img read more

Mater Dei Prep Supporters Look to CBA Model

first_imgMIDDLETOWN – They may have raised the necessary money to sustain Mater Dei Prep for another year but it is only one of the hurdles going forward for supporters of the struggling Roman Catholic high school.The next step is to establish Mater Dei Prep as an independent Catholic school, like Christian Brothers Academy, Lincroft. Mater Dei Prep currently functions as a parish school overseen by the Diocese of Trenton, according to a committee member.But before that can happen, the school must submit the required paperwork to the state Department of Education, have the appropriate insurance and apply and receive approval from the municipality, along with meeting other administrative requirements and ultimately receiving approval from the Diocese of Trenton.That requires volunteers working with the campaign to establish a separate legal entity, a state registered not-forprofit corporation that will be used as an endowment to administer the donated funding. In the future, supporters hope that endowment will have a role akin to an independent educational foundation, continuing fundraising and assisting in purchasing equipment, helping pay for capital improvements as well as other services, accordingto a committee member who is not authorized to speak for the committee.The school representatives will have to meet with Bishop David M. O’Connell and others from the Diocese of Trenton to discuss the school’s plan for its future. However, no date has yet been set.Repeated calls to the diocese seeking comment on the process going for ward were not returned; nor were calls to the Rev. Jeff Kegley, the school’s executive director and St. Mar y’s Parish pastor, and principal Craig Palmer.The school is accepting registration for the coming year and all the grade levels are scheduling for the 2015-16 year, said the committee member.“We’re doing everything we feel is necessary to open Mater Dei Prep’s doors in September,” Jim Shaw said in an email last week. “We are fully committed to the success of Mater Dei Prep and based on our conversations with current and prospective families, we believe the entire MDP community is as positive as we are.”In simple terms, explained Elizabeth Wulfhorst, public relations chairperson for the Seraph’s Fund, “We’re moving from surviving to thriving.”On Feb. 3, Kegley announced that Mater Dei Prep, which was celebrating its 50th anniversary, would have to permanently close its doors this June due to a longstanding budget deficit, unstable enrollment and the announcement late last year that the diocese would discontinue its financial support.Suppor ters, made up of families of current and former students and alumni, rallied, working to raise the money to sustain the school for the coming year and working on an extended plan for the school’s continued viability.The $1 million number was announced as the needed target to continue operations for 2015-16 and to provide the financial groundwork for the future years.— By John Burtonlast_img read more

Iconic Filmmaker Kevin Smith Comes Home To Support FilmOneFest

first_imgBy Chris Rotolo |ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – If a kid from Highlands who worked at the Quick Stop can make it, so can you.It’s a sentiment that local icon Kevin Smith has used to inspire a generation of independent filmmakers and one that holds weight, considering the Henry Hudson Regional High School alum was in fact an employee of the Leonardo convenience store while he wrote, directed and produced his breakthrough 1994 hit “Clerks.”A champion of independent film and the creative minds behind them, Smith has announced he’ll be coming home next month in support of the Atlantic Highlands-based FilmOneFest, where he’ll lead an intimate Q&A session on Sunday, May 6 at the vintage Atlantic Cinemas.“Whenever Kevin has hosted events like this, he’s always encouraging and supportive of the artists who are there to ask questions of him,” said Corinna Thuss, FilmOneFest managing director. “He’s genuine and speaks from the heart. He’s able to make a connection. That’s why his story continues to inspire. It’s his authenticity. You can’t fake that and it resonates.”Thuss is in her fourth year with the FilmOneFest – a showcase dedicated to two-minute-long films – and alongside festival founder Robert O’Connor and their staff of dedicated volunteers, the Atlantic Highlands native has worked to make the 10th anniversary of this celebration of the short film a special one.“I know 10 years is a special milestone for Robert and everyone involved and being able to have Kevin be part of the celebration speaks to how far this festival has come. We’re at a place now where we can properly host and promote a huge event featuring a filmmaker of his stature.”Smith is home recovering from life-saving surgery after he suffered a massive heart attack Feb. 25 while shooting a stand-up special in California. According to social media posts by Smith, he had a 100 percent blockage of his left anterior descending artery, also known as a widow-maker. His recovery is not expected to affect his attendance at the event.This is the second consecutive year Smith will be headlining a Q&A event in support of FilmOneFest and festival volunteer Janet Petersen is the one responsible for bringing the filmmaker on board.“Kevin has been a longtime friend of mine,” said Petersen, who met Smith in the eighth grade at Henry Hudson Regional School. “We connected from the very beginning. He was always someone that you just felt comfortable around. He genuinely cares about people and I think that’s why he and his work resonates so strongly with audiences.”Petersen, who attended college in California before settling with her family in the borough, became involved with FilmOneFest two years ago when she learned of the event through her volunteer work with the Atlantic Highlands Arts Council.“The Arts Council offers a free summer arts camp that my two boys take part in and I wanted to give back to the organization that has given my kids so much,” said Petersen, a wealth manager at Oppenheimer. “That’s when I gave Kevin a call and mentioned the festival to him. He was on board immediately and asked what we could do.”The “Intimate Q&A with Kevin Smith” is not part of the scheduled FilmOneFest events but rather a precursor to the festivities, as the festival itself is set to take place on July 21.Tickets for the event are limited and can be purchased at filmonefest.org. There are 22 rows of seating in the Atlantic Cinemas theater. Access to premium seating (Rows 2 through 5) is $60, while regular admission seating is $55.Event Prep – The Kevin Smith Tour of the Jersey ShoreKevin Smith is the mastermind behind such revered cult classics as “Clerks,” “Chasing Amy” and “Dogma,” a series of films that showcased the filmmaker’s adoration for his Bayshore roots by filming at least portions of the movies at various Jersey Shore locations.You can prepare for his forthcoming Q&A by taking this Kevin Smith Tour of the Jersey Shore:The Quick Stop: The tour starts where it all began for Smith, at the Quick Stop convenience store located at 58 Leonard Ave. in Leonardo. Smith filmed the majority of “Clerks” inside the shop, save for some street hockey antics on the roof and select scenes at the now defunct RST Video Rental. He also brought “Clerks II” to a heartwarming conclusion at the shop. Head inside to check out the Quick Stop’s “shrine” to Smith and search for the perfect dozen eggs.The Kings Arms Diner: When Ben Affleck delivered a royalty check to Jay and Silent Bob at this Belford eatery back in the 1997 film “Chasing Amy,” it was called the Marina Diner. Located at 553 Route 36, the diner has since been renamed the Kings Arms, but the layout is still the same. Walk inside, head to the left and pop a squat in the third booth on the right.Jay and Silent Bob’s Secret Stash: Stopping by The Secret Stash at 35 Broad St. in Red Bank is a must for any fan on the Kevin Smith Tour of the Jersey Shore. None of his movies were filmed at the location, but you can see memorabilia from the sets of “Clerks II” and “Dogma.”Jack’s Music Shoppe: After perusing the stash, head across the street to Jack’s Music Shoppe at 30 Broad St. where scenes from “Chasing Amy” were shot. You can also sit on the steps of the apartment to the left of the legendary record store, the upstairs abode that Affleck and Jason Lee called home in the 1997 film.Victory Park: Get away from the hustle and bustle of downtown Red Bank by heading down River Road to Victory Park in Rumson. It was on the swing set where Affleck and Joey Lauren Adams fell in love in “Chasing Amy.”Silver Ball Museum: One thing you may not have known about God – or Alanis Morissette, who played the supreme being in Smith’s 1999 production “Dogma” – is that the omniscient being is a big fan of ski ball, or at least that’s what Smith led us to believe in his star-studded spiritual satire. God can be seen strolling on the Asbury Park Boardwalk after a ski ball binge at the 1000 Ocean Ave. locale.The Berkeley Oceanfront Hotel: In “Chasing Amy” Affleck and Lee play a pair of successful comic book artists who we first see at a local comic convention. The convention was shot in the ballroom at the storied Berkeley Oceanfront Hotel at 1401 Ocean Ave. in Asbury Park.Ocean Ice Palace: After a long day of touring, the last stop on this trek brings you to the historic Ocean Ice Palace. Cool off with a skate or take in a game from the balcony seating above the ice where Affleck and Adams appeared in the climactic scene of “Chasing Amy.”This article was first published in the April 12-19, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Local Legislators Hope For Stronger Gun Storage Regulations

first_img“We talk about parents and guardians practicing responsible gun ownership, but the same needs to extend to those who are selling guns in this state,” Houghtaling said. “Again, it comes down to taking responsibility. When you’re in that business, you have a responsibility to inform your customers. And we certainly need to take responsibility in creating information that can be consumed.” The first of two bills (A-3696) requires the safe storage of a firearm and establishes penalties for improper firearm storage. Under the measure, a legal owner of a firearm that is not in use at a premise under the owner’s control is required to store the firearm in a securely locked box or container in a location, which a reasonable person would believe to be secure. Users may also secure the firearm with a trigger lock. By creating a law that calls for stricter storage requirements for firearms owners, Assemblywoman Joann Downey believes unnecessary tragedies can be avoided and the threat of gun violence in schools stemmed. Both bills are due to gobefore Assembly SpeakerCraig Coughlin (D-19) forfur ther consideration. “There are no protections against an all too familiar story we’ve seen in the news, like a young person who is suffering from anxiety or depression and then locates their parent’s gun. They take their own life and leave their family to mourn a senseless tragedy,” Downey said. Those who fail to adhere to the mandate will be found guilty of a disorderly persons offense, which carries the potential for a six-month prison sentence and a maximum $1,000 fine. According to testimony about the bill provided by Downey to the Assembly Judiciary Committee, though there are requirements and penalties meant to protect children from accessing loaded firearms that are not in use, there is no general requirement for the storage of unloaded firearms. Another staggering figure is that 80 percent of guns used in youth suicide attempts were reportedly stored in the victim’s home or accessed in the home of a friend or relative. The lack of regulation allows gun owners to leave weaponry in accessible locations like a kitchen table or a bedroom nightstand, even with ammunition situated nearby. Additionally, 75 percent of first and second graders know where their parents store their weapons and approximately 36 percent admitted to handling the family firearm without parental permission. An Assembly panel recently advanced seven measures to address gun safety concerns, including legislation sponsored by Downey (D-11) and fellow Democrat Eric Houghtaling (D-11), which specifically targets safe storage of unloaded firearms in the home, as well as mandatory education of firearm dealers about suicide prevention. According to Houghtaling, the informational materials would advise store customers and firing range patrons about different ways to prevent a friend or family member in crisis from accessing their weapon. “This is about responsibility,” Houghtaling said. “If you’re going to own a gun it’s not too much to ask that you store it properly. I’m not here to be anti-gun person. I’m not preaching about limiting a gun owner’s rights. But we have to be better about keeping guns out of the hands of those who are inexperienced, like young children.” It was a particularly disturbing sentiment for Houghtaling, who recognized a mental health concern among youth across the nation and citied several instances of youth suicide in his district during a June 17 interview with The Two River Times. The Center of Injury Research and Prevention at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia published statistics stating that 1.7 million children live with unlocked, loaded guns in their homes. The second piece of legislation (A-3896) requires the State Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal to cooperate with the Shareef M. Elnahal, the commissioner of health, to develop suicide prevention course curriculum and informational materials for retail firearm dealers who sell guns or operate a firing range to display and distribute to patrons. “No other reasonable nation allows for firearms to be left unsecured where any child or thief can easily obtain them. If every firearm in New Jersey were safely secured in a locked container tomorrow, we would see the rate of suicides, unintentional tragedies and school shootings rapidly plummet,” Downey said.last_img read more

Bayshore Towns See Benefit in Regional Agreement

first_imgPerry said when the meeting’s discussion turned to a proposed regional shared service agreement he was immediately intrigued, but admits pulling it off could take some effort, especially when Middletown stands to shoulder a great deal of the operational burden. “What we’re looking to see is if, as employees retire, instead of replacing completely, can the three of us share the costs of bringing in someone new to oversee all of our operations,” Gonzales said. “These are the types of things that will save taxpayers and the towns money. And it aligns with what the state is looking to do.” Perry views the new town hall construction as a possible centerpiece for this regional shared service accord and called it a potential resource for the entire Bayshore community. “We don’t need the state to tell us that shared services are the way to go. We’ve all been doing that already,” Middletown Mayor Tony Perry said. “Reducing duplication and allowing for cost savings to occur is our responsibility.” “We used to use a database so we can seeif Joe Smith had been arrested previously inother municipalities. There is other softwarein use today, but it proves how useful regionalservices can be.” According to Middletown Township administrator Tony Mercantante, the investigation could go out to bid in July. Bayshore area towns share a similar geography and comparable maintenance obstacles. That has some municipal officials pondering the benefits of a regional shared service agreement. “There’s absolutely a benefit to shared services in general, let alone regional collaboration. We would not be doing our job if we didn’t consider it. Fiscal responsibility lies with all of us,” Hubeny said. “Right now, if we want to do work with Union Beach or Hazlet, we can’t, because we don’t have an agreement in place and there is a process we would need to go through,” Gonzales said. “With a joint agreement in place, any town in the Bayshore region could opt in if they wanted to.” County and municipal government reform and the use of additional shared services is a pillar of the state Legislature’s Path to Progress, a bipartisan plan to rescue New Jersey from what Senate President Steve Sweeney called a “fiscal crisis.” In addition to expanding interlocal shared services, Path to Progress calls for pension and benefit reform, leveraging assets to stabilize the pension system, education reform at the administrative level – including the concept of regional districts to create fewer administrative-level employees – and reworking the state and municipal tax structure. According to Gonzales, Highlands is currently using free DCA services for an audit of each of the borough’s municipal departments to determine if future personnel sharing is an option with the neighboring boroughs of Atlantic Highlands and Sea Bright. Last week Middletown broke ground at the future site of its new town hall complex, a 72,000-square-foot facility that will place all municipal operations, including the police department and court services, under one roof. center_img Some think it could work, and one borough administrator says she’s already taking the steps to test the viability. Hubeny said his borough currently works with neighboring Highlands for mechanic work on municipal vehicles, as well as courtroom services. Another agreement is in place for Middletown to handle the borough’s brush and leaf collections. Earlier this month, Middletown announced its plans to investigate the Bayshore’s main thoroughfare, Route 36, as an area in need of redevelopment. The investigation will study about five miles of highway from the border of Keansburg at Palmer Avenue to the intersection of Leonardville Road and Route 36 near Atlantic Highlands. The goal is to create mechanisms that will entice developers to work with tricky properties that remain undeveloped, underutilized or abandoned. “A lot of towns are leaning on Middletown and it’s because of our size and resources. But there’s benefits to us. One of the reasons we’re building the new town hall is because of the potential it creates to expand our shared services. I already see the potential court sharing, which already happens a lot in the Two River area. The more we share, the more we can reduce taxes for residents,” Perry said. Though the investigation is limited to Middletown properties, better collaboration and a pooling of resources could lead to similar research and development in other Route 36 municipalities. Since the meeting, which occurred in May and included representatives of Aberdeen, Atlantic Highlands, Hazlet, Holmdel, Keansburg, Keyport, Matawan and Middletown, Gonzales said she has had preliminary discussions with the New Jersey Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) to lay the groundwork for an eventual feasibility study. Atlantic Highlands Borough administrator Adam Hubeny is a former police officer who said he’s witnessed the fruits of similar collaborative efforts at the technological level. During a recent monthly meeting of the Bayshore mayors the topic was broached and approximately “90 to 95 percent” of the municipalities in attendance expressed interest in striking such an accord, said Highlands Borough administrator Kim Gonzales. “We investigate every shared service and sometimes proposals don’t get implemented because we don’t see enough of a benefit for the town. For this to work each governing body is going to have to weigh in on what they can bring to the table, Middletown included, and compare it to what they’re getting back. It will be a process, but it’s possible,” Perry said. But a regional agreement could expandthe benefits. The Bayshore mayors are due to meet again Friday, June 28.last_img read more

Spokane Braves spoil New Year’s Eve party for Leafs, edge home side 3-2

first_imgBy Bruce FuhrThe Nelson Daily SportsNo doubt the Nelson Leafs are happy to see the close of 2011.Because after playing perhaps one of their worst games of the season New Year’s Eve things can’t get any worse for the Green and White heading into 2012.Brandon Amatto stopped 24 of 26 shots to backstop the Spokane Braves to a 3-2 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the Leafs Saturday afternoon at the NDCC Arena.The loss erases a perfect opportunity for Nelson to climb up the Murdoch standings after division-leading Beaver Valley was beaten twice this weekend by the Castlegar Rebels and comes on the heels of a 7-1 trouncing the Leafs dealt Spokane Friday in the Lilac City.”I think (Friday) we came into the game prepared but today we had a bit of complacency,” said Leaf captain Tyler Parfeniuk.””We came in pretty confident . . . after the first it was all right,” Parfeniuk added. “But the second period kind of killed us.”Critics may disagree with the Leaf captain.Needing a late goal by Nick Newman in the first period to finish the frame tied against a team Nelson dominated the night before is not the way Leaf coach Frank Maida explained the game plan to the team before the game started.And it definitely wasn’t the way the game was to play out in the second when Spokane scored twice in the period, the second goal coming on a breakaway by Alex Marmon after the Leafs defence whiffed on a puck at the opposition blue line.Trailing 3-1 after two periods, Nelson got some life in the second when Dallon Stoddart crashed the net to beat Amatto from close range.But the 20-year-old Spokane native slammed the door on the Leaf shooters the rest of the game shedding some light on what has been a less than great season.”I think the past month hasn’t been the greatest of hockey for us so I will be nice to go into the next month fresh,” Parfeniuk said, looking to take some positive out of the conclusion to 2011.”It will be nice to get a week off and get right back at it next week.”Dylan Tappe, on the power play in the first period, and Uriah Machuga in the second completed the scoring for the 15-18-1 Braves.Nelson, 20-14-0-2, out shot Spokane 26-20 in the game, but only after a third-period push that saw the hosts with a 13-6 advantage.Friday, the Leafs held a 39-31 advantage including an 11-5 total in the second period.The Leafs finish the month of December 3-5 with four losses coming against Murdoch Division opponents.Nelson begins a three-game home stand Friday when the team hosts Princeton Posse at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.Saturday, the Leafs welcome the lowly Grand Forks Border Bruins.LEAF NOTES: Friday, Brett Norman led the charge with two goals and three assists. Jonathon Petrash also scored twice while adding a helper. Carsen Willans, Matti Jmaeff and Nick Newman had singles. Newman and Linden Horswill each had three points while Jmaeff and Colten Schell had two points. Kurtis Redding scored the lone goal for the Braves. Andrew Walton earned the win in goal for Nelson. . . .Friday’s game was delayed 45 minutes when glass at the Spokane end of the ice was shattered during warm-up. The result saw the Leafs get back into Nelson at 3:30 a.m. . . . Forward Colton Malmsten and defenceman Julian Davis were scratches for Saturday. . . .The Leafs currently have 22 players on the roster, which means coach Frank Maida has one more card available before the upcoming B.C. Hockey roster deadline. . . . The Braves played Saturday’s game without head coach Mike Bay behind the bench.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

Soccer Quest packs in the players for Nelson summer camp

first_imgThe Soccer Quest camps, in partnership with Vancouver Whitecaps FC to help deliver development summer camps throughout the BC Interior and the Kootenay area’s for 2012, focused on improving fundamentals needed in the ever-changing game.This is the second year of a Whitecaps partnership with Soccer Quest in the Kootenays.Soccer Quest is the only full-time soccer company in the Kootenays. With its indoor soccer facility located in Nelson and for the past five years it has helped raise the profile of soccer in the Kootenay area.The success of the program shows with several players gaining college scholarships and selection to the Whitecaps FC Residency program. Soccer Quest summer camps have been in the Kootenays and Central Interior of BC for the past 13 years.Soccer Quest is a Canadian company locally owned and operated with a full time C.S.A. licensed staff. The sun was shining no potential National Team players at the Soccer Quest camp held this past week at the Lakeside Pitch.Players from tots to teenager flocked to the pitch to receive expert coaching from the Quest staff.last_img read more