Water supply on WCD restored, brings relief to residents

first_imgThe villages on the West Coast of Demerara (WCD) that were out of potable water for the past weeks can now breathe a sigh of relief as the Guyana Water Incorporated (GWI) restored the provision of this commodity on Saturday.The residents had been without running water as a result of low power provided by the Guyana Power and Light Inc (GPL).As a result, residents were forced to jog water from long distances. Some were forced to purchase water, while other had to do without that commodity.A fire truck from the Guyana Fire Service (GFS) had to come in and supply the affected villages, such as De Kendren and Meten-Meer-Zorg, with water.However, the residents are now appreciative of the work put in to have the water restored by the Guyana Water Incorporated (GWI).“They came and they really did their work after they found out about the situation, because I spoke to a representative personally, who tell me what the work entailed to having the water running again; and I am glad, because we were really struggling. Thanks, God,” one resident expressed.Another said, “The water pressure is high too; so whatever they do, I glad, because I was fed-up. But I am glad that we ain’t have to worry about that every morning now; it was stressful”.Meanwhile, some villages on the East Coast of Demerara are still without water. The GWI has not reached out to those residents, and as such, they are very much frustrated. Those villages that are affected are Plaisance, Better Hope, Ogle and Goedverwagting.last_img read more

Why just keep ’em in your wallet?

first_imgROCHESTER, N.Y. – More Americans than ever are wearing their photographs. Or eating them. Or showcasing them on calendars, greeting cards and china plates. In the versatile digital age, picture-bearing merchandise is a booming segment of the photo-printing market – and a lucrative one, too. Now the mostly online arena appears poised to gravitate big-time to the corner pharmacy. Scores of online players – led by Shutterfly Inc., Eastman Kodak Co.’s KodakGallery.com and Hewlett-Packard Co.’s Snapfish.com – tout a variety of photo novelties, from laser-etched crystal ornaments to personalized postcards, key rings, T-shirts, purses, mugs, mousepads, birthday cakes and lollipops. Kodak and Japan’s Fujifilm Holdings Corp., which divided up the traditional film market, are unveiling new technologies and partnerships designed to counter eroding profits from film processing by reeling in custom-photo customers via retail channels. But the blossoming of often-pricey alternatives, from photo apparel to putting computer reproductions of images onto posters, Jacuzzi tiles, furniture and tombstones, drove an 11 percent jump in overall revenues from $9.9 billion in 2005 to $11.1 billion in 2006, Delis said. The latest number includes $6.7 billion in sales of digital cameras, which analysts say have landed in almost 60 percent of America’s 110 million households. Prices run from $13.99 for a photo mug to $49.99 for a sterling necklace containing a picture of a loved one. Prices are $39.99 for a 20-picture photo book and $34.99 for a teddy bear wearing a custom-photo sweat shirt. Redwood City-based Shutterfly, which generated $40 million in fourth-quarter sales of personalized products such as photo-adorned necklaces and handbags, is the biggest online player, with a 25 percent share, said analyst Chris Chute of IDC Corp. Its most popular holiday item was a photo-collage card that can carry up to nine pictures. “We sold tens and tens of millions of them,” said Chief Executive Jeffrey Housenbold, boasting gross profit margins of more than 50 percent. “We give away most of our services, and we make money when people print. There’s a big trend that people don’t want to just have the same generic jewelry or the same generic card. “There’s just inherent limitation as to what you can do in retail,” Housenbold added. “You don’t have the creative choices, the high-quality user experience. And you don’t have the time or the convenience when you’re in retail.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! U.S. sales in the specialty market – counting online and retail – jumped 50 percent to an estimated $694 million in 2006 from $461 million in 2005 and could reach $951 million this year and $1.2 billion in 2008, according to Photo Marketing Association International, a trade group whose annual convention opens Thursday in Las Vegas. “The photo industry is desperately looking for ways to replace the money lost to lower volumes and lower prices for basic 4-by-6-inch prints,” said Alan Bullock, a consumer-imaging analyst at InfoTrends Inc. “There’s a whole slew of products out there generating higher margins than 4-by-6 prints ever did. When people see one for the first time, they go, `Wow, that’s really cool!”‘ The swift transition to a world without film triggered a slide in the overall number of snapshots converted into prints. Digital and film images made at home or ordered from retailers and Web sites fell from a peak of 30.3 billion in 2000 to 26.6 billion in 2006 and could bottom out at around 22.5 billion by 2009, predicted Dimitrios Delis, research director at the Jackson, Mich.-based Photo Marketing Association. last_img