Elections 2019: Ó Fearraigh retains seat

first_imgSinn Féin’s John Shéamuis Ó Fearraigh is the second councillor to be re-elected to Glenties LEA.In 2014, Ó Fearraigh secured his seat on the ninth count with 1,864 votes.Today he was elected after achieving 2,050 votes on the eighth count. His surplus of 175 votes will now be redistributed before the final count for Glenties LEA.There were exuberant scenes in the Highlands Hotel this evening when his election was announced, celebrating with colleagues Brian Carr, Marie Theresa Gallagher, and Pearse Doherty TD.John Shéamuis Ó Fearraigh hugs SF colleagues Brian Carr and Marie Therese Gallagher. Photo by Elaine Mc CalligIt is yet to be announced how the final figures will look for Brian Carr and Marie Therese Gallagher.Following the eighth count, here’s what the figures look like:Brian Carr (SF) 1282Marie Theresa Gallagher (SF) 1658Michael Mc Clafferty (Fine Gael) 1721Noreen McGarvey (FF) 1499Anthony Molloy (FF) 1702John Sheamuis Ó Fearraigh (SF) 2050 Quota: 1,875, Electorate: 23,165, Turnout: 12,851, Spoiled: 147, Valid: 12,704Elections 2019: Ó Fearraigh retains seat was last modified: May 26th, 2019 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegal county council. local elections 2019John Shéamuis Ó Fearraighle19donegalSinn Feinlast_img read more

Raiders legend Cliff Branch dies at 71

first_imgNAPA — Cliff Branch, who played on three Super Bowl championship teams and played his entire 14-year with the Raiders, died Saturday, the club confirmed.Branch turned 71 years old on Thursday. No cause of death has been released. According to the Bullhead Ciy (Arizona) police Twitter account, Branch was found  deceased in his hotel room at 3:40 p.m.“The initial investigation revealed no suspected foul play and that Mr. Branch died of natural causes,” according to the tweet.On August 3, …last_img read more

Alien Life in Meteorites Claimed

first_imgAfter scrutinizing rare meteorites for over a decade, a NASA astrobiologist decided to go with his announcement: he may have found alien life.  Fox News began his story, “We are not alone in the universe – and alien life forms may have a lot more in common with life on Earth than we had previously thought.  That’s the stunning conclusion one NASA scientist has come to, releasing his groundbreaking revelations in a new study in the March edition of the Journal of Cosmology.”    There are only about nine CI-1 carbonaceous chondrites known.  In the ones Dr. Richard B. Hoover has cracked open and studied, he has found “fossilized remains of micro-organisms not so different from ordinary ones found underfoot – here on earth, that is.”  That’s one of the strange things about this story.  If these are organisms that originated independently of earth, why would some of them be recognizable as “generic species here on earth”?  Another problem is that the samples contain no nitrogen, an essential ingredient in life as we know it.  All amino acids and DNA contain nitrogen.    Hoover tried to be extremely careful with his samples, and expected a hotbed of controversy.  He has invited scrutiny of his work by 100 experts, and wants thousands of scientists around the world to weigh in on its validity.  Some, like David Marais, another NASA astrobiologist, are taking a wait-and-see attitude: “These kinds of claims have been made before, he noted – and found to be false.”  Seth Shostak of the SETI Institute doesn’t rule out the possibility but recognizes the controversial claim will have far-reaching implications.  He speculated that this might support panspermia of some sort: “It would suggest, well, life didn’t really begin on the Earth, it began as the solar system was forming.”  That raises other questions of how and where environments in the early solar system could have been more conducive to life than planet earth.    Rob Sheldon, a colleague of Hoover’s and an advocate of intelligent design, mentioned Hoover last December in his blog response on The Procrustean responding to the arsenic-life claim (12/02/2010).  He indicated that Hoover probably would have expected alien life to be very different biochemically from earth life.    On a different but related story, New Scientist and the BBC News speculated that “Meteorites ‘could have carried nitrogen to Earth’” in the form of ammonia carried on chondrites, chips of asteroids.  Aside from questions left begging about whether these “missing ingredients for life” had anything to do with the origin of life, that story appears contradictory to Hoover’s, who found no nitrogen in his samples.  “If someone can explain,” Hoover said, “how it is possible to have a biological remain that has no nitrogen, or nitrogen below the detect ability limits that I have, in a time period as short as 150 years, then I would be very interested in hearing that.”Is this another claim in the tradition of the Martian meteorite ALH 84001?  Is NASA trying to get more funding (01/07/2005) for astrobiology?  Possibly.  They’ve probably learned how to be more careful by now and give the appearance of honest skeptical inquiry.  In the early stages of controversial announcements, the Marais wait-and-see response is wise.  The best advice is to look carefully at the raw data, check assumptions, and ask the right questions.  The first question is to verify if this really is fossilized living material.  The second is to rule out contamination.  The third is to avoid jumping to conclusions and to consider all the possibilities.    With the Martian meteorite, the similarities to cells were superficial and never widely accepted as anything more than coincidental shapes.  Years after the huge flurry of media hype, after scientists found other ways the shapes could have been generated chemically, the hubbub died down.  Now only a few scientists believe it (12/14/2000, 11/20/2001, 03/18/2002, 05/15/2002, 01/30/2004, 03/23/2006, 09/01/2009).    Maybe this time things will be different.  Hoover seems more cautious than McKay.  What if the majority confirms that this was living material?  Does it mean life evolved in outer space?  No; it could have been created somewhere else, or it may be earth life that got here by a round trip.  Creation scientist Walt Brown has a theory that asteroids and comets were ejected from earth at the time of the Flood, when hyper-pressurized water shot into space from the fountains of the great deep, carrying rocky material from the continental margins with it.  It’s a speculative idea, but it’s one possibility to have life get out to space and back.  As for the Fox News lead-in that “We are not alone in the universe,” good grief; this is about the solar system, not the universe (see extrapolation).    Materialists will undoubtedly hype evolution, but the details revealed so far should be as puzzling to them as to their critics.  No nitrogen, but similar to earth life?  Astrobiologists have long tried to argue that life found elsewhere is bound to be very different from ours, but from the photos, these structures look remarkably similar to known bacteria.  Nothing in creation science or intelligent design requires life only to be found on earth anyway (see initial thoughts by ID advocate Denyse O’Leary on Uncommon Descent).  And why are these structures found only in a very rare class of meteorites, instead of all of them?    Further speculation is unwise till the claim goes through the scrutiny of skeptical scientists.  This commentary should only caution readers that healthy skepticism of spectacular claims is always in order, and to beware of being led down the primrose path by the media to answers without first asking the questions.    Already Fox News’s exclusive story is echoing around the world on other news sources and blogs.  Undoubtedly there will be more to say later about this claim.  Have your Baloney Detector tuned and ready.Update 03/07/2011: Criticisms of the claim are starting to come in from the scientific community and from evolutionists (see Space.com, PhysOrg, and Fox News follow-up story), so don’t get too excited about alien bacteria just yet.  Space.com also posted a gallery of past alleged proofs of alien life.Update 03/08/2011: New Scientist said there is “monster mud-slinging” going on among scientists about this claim.  Jeffrey Bada pointed out that minerals can show “many non-biological artefacts” to confuse the observer.  Alison Olcott Marshall [U of Kansas] said, “Morphology alone isn’t enough; geological context isn’t enough – you need all the pieces.  You need multiple lines of evidence: morphology that is highly reminiscent of biology, a geological context that makes sense and strong chemical evidence.”  New Scientist also hinted that the paper might have been a last gasp for the Journal of Cosmology, a journal deemed dubious by other astrobiologists.  It may go out of business in a few months.  This story is looking like a bright meteor – in and out of public attention in record time.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

International EarthCache Day is October 9!

first_imgOn October 9, you can earn a new souvenir by learning more about the Earth (aka geocaching’s game board). All you have to do is go out and find an EarthCache on International EarthCache Day!EarthCaches don’t have physical containers, but instead bring you to a unique location and teach you a geological science lesson. Check out these stunning EarthCaches to learn more.On International EarthCache Day, this special geocache type will be free to all players in the Geocaching® app.* The app makes finding and logging EarthCaches easy. Just send your answers to the geocache owner via Message Center!Get the Geocaching® App.*Excludes specifically designated Premium Member Only caches.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedInternational EarthCache celebration for 2018October 8, 2018In “Events”Earn a new souvenir for International EarthCache DaySeptember 8, 2015In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”Discover EarthCaching and 11 Stunning LocationsAugust 5, 2014In “Community”last_img read more

Rails Rumble: Micro-App Competition Winners Announced

first_imgSo, that’s what the expert panel of judges and hordes of Rail-loving masses deigned the cream of the crop this year. What’s your take; do any of these apps inspire or excite you? Second Place: How’s My Code?How’s My Code is a peer review tool for developers to comment on, approve of, and flag commits. Email notifications allow users to come back to ongoing discussions. If you spend more time on GitHub than Facebook, this might be an app for you to check out.Here’s a screencast explaining the app:Third Place: TablesurfingUsing Facebook Connect, the Tablesurfing team created an app for those who are into impromptu dinner parties. “Like couchsurfing, but for tables,” Tablesurfing connects users who like to cook with users who are comfortable dining in the homes of strangers (i.e., the adventurous and hungry.) Of course, the concept is replete with issues (necessary critical mass of user adoption, sketch factor of inviting those weird “Internet people” into your home), but it’s a sweet idea with a nice UI.Check out the demo video here:Appearance Category Winner: LowdownLowdown (currently offline for post-Rumble revamping) is/was a drop-dead gorgeous task/project management tool for working with Cucumber. As the development team wrote, ‘If Cucumber lets us ‘describe how software should behave in plain text… in a business-readable domain-specific language’ then Lowdown is the tea party where thinly sliced sandwiches are served on nice platters instead of trying to swallow it whole.’ Full-featured and flexible, it was one of several related apps in the Rumble yet stood out for its pristine user interface that was a breeze to understand and use and a pleasure to look at. We look forward to playing around with the app more once it relaunches.Take a look at this demo in the meantime:Usefulness Category Winner: ZenVDN“Talk about ambitious – building a video delivery network for the Rumble is crazy!” So wrote expert and Viget Labs technology director Ben Scofield of ZenVDN. Perhaps the nature and scope of the project isn’t such a surprise when one considers that the team behind this project also constructed web video apps ZenCoder and Flix Cloud. Ambitious or not, the site is good-looking and designed for simplicity. ZenVDN encodes videos for the web and mobile devices, allows for HD resolution and embedding, and makes use of a global content delivery network. Truth be told, as it must be on a tech news blog, we were unsuccessful in our attempts to upload a video to our profile, and ironically, the app’s demo video was not embeddable.UPDATE: ZenVDN just emailed us this embeddable version of their demo:There’s something to be said for constructing a full-fledged application in 48 hours. There’s something else to be said for naming said application in such a way that conjures only the fondest memories of Dana Carvey in a platinum wig. Simply put, “Hurl makes HTTP requests. Enter a URL, set some headers, then view the response. Perfect for APIs.” Hurl comes from Pownce founder/Six Apart engineer Leah Culver and Chris Wanstrath and will officially launch soon.Completeness Category Winner: hurlCheck out the screencast for a demo:Innovation Category Winner: LAZEROIDS!!!This team built a neverending, massively mutliplayer, peer-to-peer version of Asteroids with sound design that had commenters raving (pew! pew!). LAZEROIDS!!! (sic) was moreover developed with complete disregard for IE support. Still, experts and commenters alike were impressed with the execution and simplicity of this app. You can check out the team’s blog for information on the architecture, or you can just go play the game. Solo Category Winner: AlertMe.tvOne is the loneliest number, and special consideration was given to the developers who chose to fly solo in this competition. One of our favorite apps – a well-designed, useful tool – was AlertMe.tv, a simple system for users’ opting in to notifications about their favorite TV shows. Email, SMS, or IM notifications are sent when new episodes are about to air. Adding new shows to the site’s database is also particularly simple. As someone who needs to be reminded when Saturday Night Live airs, I particularly appreciate this app. Congratulations to Jacques Crocker, the Rails Jedi of Silicon Valley. Couch potatoes the world around salute you. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Microapp#start jolie odell 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting In 48 hours last weekend, 237 developer teams competed and generated a total of 137 qualifying web applications, all developed with Ruby and Rails on the back end.The 2009 Rails Rumble was, according to organizers, the strongest yet in the contest’s history. (Disclosure: I was on the “expert panel” of judges for the Rumble and got a sneak peak at a significant handful of apps.)As microapps (as this particular brand of simple, single-function sites and widgets could be called) occupy an ever-increasing tract of Internet real estate, time-crunch events such as Startup Weekend and Rails Rumble serve as tests of skill and team-building challenges, not to mention endurance competitions as developers burn through hour after sleepless hour. Yet with each cycle, these events do produce a number of noteworthy apps that might grow into something more in the weeks and months to follow while teaching all developers valuable lessons about simplicity in interface design. Here’s a quick breakdown of the eight winning Rails Rumble applications.First Place: Hi.ImHi I’m is (yet another) service that aggregates a user‘s social streams to a centralized location, sort of like Retaggr, Chi.mp, and their ilk. The idea wasn’t the most innovative, as many of the 80 comments on this project noted, but the user experience was as simple as following the yellow brick road. The app was developed by San Jose-based web/mobile development shop Koombea. Related Posts last_img read more

Hills party representatives to fast unto death for Gorkhaland

first_imgAn all-party meeting in Darjeeling on Tuesday concluded that one representative of each political party in the hills will undertake a fast unto death from July 15 to take forward the demand of Gorkhaland.Announcing the decision, Benoy Tamang, Assistant General Secretary of Gorkha Janmukti Morcha (GJM), said the ongoing indefinite strike that began on June 15 will continue.In addition, the parties also decided to lay seige to the offices of the District Magistrate and Sub Divisional Officers with the help of Gorkhaland supporters from July 14.The Gorkhaland Movement Coordination Committee (GMCC), convened by the representatives of all the political parties in the hills, decided that all awards received from West Bengal Government would be returned on July 13. The chairman and vice chairman of the development boards set up by the State government has been asked to resign at 6pm on July 14.Meanwhile, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee who addressed a public gathering at Digha in Purba Medinipur assured people that her government would restore peace in the hills.While she urged the people in the hills to give peace a chance and not play with fire, she accused the Centre of creating tension in the Darjeeling hills.last_img read more

Homi Adajanias next a biopic on an unsung hero

first_imgMumbai, Apr 18 (PTI) Director Homi Adajania is working on a biopic of an unsung hero, a story which he believes everybody should know.Homi, who has made films like “Being Cyrus”, “Cocktail” and “Finding Fanny”, has ventured into the genre of biopics for the first time.”I genuinely dont know which film will go on the floors next. I am working on a couple of ideas including a biopic. Its challenging to make one (biopic) but its an interesting space to be in,” Homi told PTI.When asked if the biopic is based on any sports personality or a person from the film industry, he says, “No not at all. Its the story of an unsung hero. But I cant give out any details at the moment. All I can say is everyone should know the story.”In a role-reversal, Homi, who had earlier directed films for Dinesh Vijan, is now one of the producers of the latters directorial debut “Raabta”.”Dinesh was the co-producer of my first film and then when he was directing the film, I felt I should be there for him. We have been around to help each other and we get along well, so its a great partnership,” he says.”I used to give inputs and ideas, I was not involved in what he was making. The final decision was taken by him.””Raabta” starring Sushant Singh Rajput and Kriti Sanon is set to release on June 9. PTI KKP GK SSNlast_img read more

Study analyzes vaccinepreventable infections in children who receive solid organ transplants

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 15 2019Children who receive solid organ transplants are hospitalized due to vaccine-preventable infections at rates that are significantly higher than the general population, according to a newly published study by University of Colorado School of Medicine researchers.The study, published today in JAMA Pediatrics, reviewed nearly 7,000 transplant recipients nationally over a seven-year period beginning Jan. 1, 2004, to determine how often they are hospitalized with infections that are typically prevented with vaccines.Of the 6,980 transplant recipients in the study, 1,092 patients, or 15.6 percent, were hospitalized with a total of 1,490 cases of vaccine-preventable infections within five years after transplant surgery. At that rate, hospitalization among the transplant population was up to 87 times higher than in the general population.Related StoriesMore effective flu vaccine begins clinical trials across the U.S.Researchers develop improved vaccine for meningitis and bloodstream infectionsVaccine drama on display in California’s Capitol”The huge burden of illness from vaccine-preventable infections that we show in this article should stress to all physicians the critical importance of ensuring that all transplant patients receive age-appropriate immunizations,” said the study’s lead author, Amy Feldman, MD, MSCS, assistant professor of pediatrics for the CU School of Medicine and program director for the liver transplant fellowship at Children’s Hospital Colorado on the Anschutz Medical Campus.While other studies have looked at morbidity from certain types of infections, this study is the first to explore the burden of illness from all vaccine-preventable infections across the entire pediatric solid organ transplant population. The analysis included all patients younger than 18 years old who underwent a heart, lung, liver, kidney, intestine, or multivisceral transplant at any of the 45 U.S. not-for-profit tertiary care pediatric hospitals that report data to the Pediatric Health Information System of the Children’s Hospital Association.Based on the findings, Feldman and her co-authors recommend further study to identify ways to improve the likelihood of vaccination among children who need transplant surgery. The goal is to reduce the costs of hospitalization and the rates of sickness and death due to infections that could be prevented by vaccination. Source:http://www.ucdenver.edu/last_img read more