Penn State : Campus vandalized after students riot in support of Paterno

first_img Published on November 9, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Jon: jdharr04@syr.edu Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Only a shade of what was done hours earlier remained by 5:45 a.m. Thursday.Two lampposts were still down near College Avenue. Both metal posts were snapped at their concrete bases. One of the posts, across from the Student Book Store on College Avenue, had its glass broken while the other post had its lights on and illuminated a dark morning. Thousands of Pennsylvania State University students flocked the downtown area Wednesday night into Thursday morning to display their anger over the firing of longtime football coach Joe Paterno, 84.Paterno, who has the most wins of any coach in Division I college football history, was fired Wednesday night in light of a sexual abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. Paterno’s lack of action following a meeting with Athletic Director Tim Curley, who was placed on administrative leave earlier this week, resulted in the termination. Paterno was in his 46th year coaching the Nittany Lions.Graham Spanier, the longtime Penn State president, was also removed by the Board of Trustees on Wednesday night.Toilet paper still covered parts of College Avenue. Rocks — which angry students reportedly threw at media members and police officers — were displaced across the sidewalk. Students also flipped over a television news van that was parked along College Avenue. The van was turned upright by 6 a.m.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPolice officers were forced to use pepper spray to control the crowd.Paterno issued a statement Wednesday night after the news of his firing broke.‘Right now, I’m not the football coach, and that’s something I have to get used to,’ Paterno said, according to the Associated Press.Several media outlets gathered at Paterno’s home at 830 McKee St. in State College, Pa., Thursday morning in hopes that the legendary Penn State coach would answer questions. Although most of the Penn State assistant coaches filed in and out of Paterno’s modest ranch home Thursday morning, he had yet to address the media at 12:15 p.m.jdharr04@syr.edulast_img read more

Human Common Ancestor Lived 3500 Years Ago

first_imgNature Science Update reported on a surprising find by Joseph Change (Yale) and Douglas Rohde (MIT).  They claim, based on computer modeling of human breeding and migration, that we are all related to the same common ancestor, not millions, but just thousands of years ago, possibly just 1500 BC in Asia, and that perhaps a couple of thousand years before that, everyone alive at that time was an ancestor of all of us living today.  The results are published in Nature Sept. 30.1    The finding is not entirely new; it is more a refinement of simpler models taking better account of migration and geographical isolation.  It does not mean people didn’t exist before that, but only that the current population is genealogically related.  Jotun Hein (Oxford) cautions in the same issue2 that genealogical questions are “distinct from questions about the history of our genetic material,” which are estimated by different methods: “Universal common ancestry (in the pedigree sense) and genetic common ancestry thus occur on different timescales,” he says.    If you think about it, it’s not all that surprising that in relatively few generations, a population’s family trees will overlap.  Think of inverted pyramids that overlap slightly; as they grow (going back in time), they will all eventually converge, unless the populations are completely isolated, which does not seem to be the case for any people group.  Simple models that assumed random mating converged in just 33 generations, or 800 years ago, which is clearly unrealistic.  By taking geography and history into account, Hein says, Rohde has tried to arrive at a more credible date for the MRCA (most recent common ancestor).  Even more surprising, Hein says, the models predict that before the MRCA, anyone alive would have been an ancestor of everyone alive today.  Rohde, Olsen and Chang explain:Given the remaining uncertainties about migration rates and real-world mating patterns, the date of the MRCA [most recent common ancestor] for everyone living today cannot be identified with great precision.  Nevertheless, our results suggest that the most recent common ancestor for the world’s current population lived in the relatively recent past–perhaps within the last few thousand years.  And a few thousand years before that, although we have received genetic material in markedly different proportions from the people alive at the time, the ancestors of everyone on the Earth today were exactly the same. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)The implication is that the entire human race today, no matter the continent, culture, skin color, language or lifestyle, is a member of one big family:Further work is needed to determine the effect of this common ancestry on patterns of genetic variation in structured populations.  But to the extent that ancestry is considered in genealogical rather than genetic terms, our findings suggest a remarkable proposition: no matter the languages we speak or the colour of our skin, we share ancestors who planted rice on the banks of the Yangtze, who first domesticated horses on the steppes of the Ukraine, who hunted giant sloths in the forests of North and South America, and who laboured to build the Great Pyramid of Khufu.For another summary, see the report on EurekAlert, “Most recent common ancestor of all humans surprisingly recent.”  Few other popular science news sources are reporting the story – not New Scientist, Scientific American, National Geographic, the BBC News or MSNBC – as eagerly as they typically do with discoveries of hominid fossils alleged to be human evolutionary ancestors.1Douglas L. T. Rohde, Steve Olson, and Joseph T. Chang, “Modelling the recent common ancestry of all living humans,” Nature 431, 562 – 566 (30 September 2004); doi:10.1038/nature02842.2Jotun Hein, “Human evolution: Pedigrees for all humanity,” Nature 431, 518 – 519 (30 September 2004); doi:10.1038/431518a.Notice the model converges on a few thousand years ago, not millions.  Such a date is closer to Noah than Lucy.  Care should be exercised interpreting what this means, because it is somewhat of a counterintuitive artifact of a mathematical model that makes certain assumptions.  Another counterintuitive result, Hein claims, is that “not many generations ago (about six), members of our pedigree existed that did not contribute to us genetically.”  The authors are not claiming that humankind popped into existence a few thousand years ago, but only that everyone alive today had the same ancestors.  Can the same models be applied to guppies, tigers and oak trees?  Hein points to additional interesting questions that will require further refinement of models and the combining of pedigree and genetic ancestry information.  One question he asks is, “In the idealized models, how far back would one have to go to find a single couple who are the lone ancestors of everybody?” to which we might add, “and did their names start with A and E?”    We can’t judge how valid is Professor Rohdes’ computer model, but it is interesting that this was not published by Answers in Genesis, but by Nature and by researchers from MIT and Yale – not institutions particularly interested in validating Biblical chronology.  It calls into question evolutionary assumptions about human pedigrees stretching back tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands of years.  It also means that all those “racial” differences between people are superficial and must be of recent origin.  Like AIG has emphasized in its Biblical creationist answer to racism, we truly are of “one blood,” just as Paul told the Greek philosophers on Mars Hill (Acts 17).(Visited 332 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South African marks Disability Rights Awareness Month

first_img5 November 2015 Disability Rights Awareness Month (Dram) was launched at Optima College, which caters exclusively for blind and partially sighted people, in Pretoria on 3 November by Social Development Minister Bathabile Dlamini.Dram will run for a month, from 3 November to 3 December. It aims to increase awareness of the rights of people with disabilities as equal citizens in society in general. The month-long campaign also calls for speeding up equal access to socio-economic opportunities.This year, Dram is celebrating 60 years of the Freedom Charter under the theme: “South Africa – a free and just society inclusive of all persons with disabilities as equal citizens’.DSD Min addresses the media at the launch of National Disability Rights Awareness Month #DisabilityRightsSA pic.twitter.com/KoxOM2eE6U— SA Gov News (@SAgovnews) November 3, 2015Against all oddsCyclist Palesa Manaleng was in a cycling accident in 2014 in which she was paralysed from her waist down. But that hasn’t stopped her from continuing her passion for riding. She will be taking part in the Momentum 947 Cycle Challenge in Joburg on 15 November, during Dram.Manaleng spent three months recovering in hospital from a dislocated spine, among other injuries. “I was lying on my bed at the Rehab Hospital and I was watching the Cycling Challenge and for the first time since my accident I was excited about something,” she recalled.“My problem, or so I thought, was that I could no longer walk and I knew at that moment lying in that bed that I wanted the feeling of freedom that those cyclists possessed.”She told her physiotherapist and occupational therapist she wanted to continue to cycle, but didn’t know how. “They showed me photos of Pieter du Preez on his hand-cycle and I knew then and there, I needed one,” she said.Watch more of Manaleng’s story here:After hearing about her story, the Cycle Challenge’s organisers decided to sponsor Manaleng with a hand-cycle, a cycling kit, training assistance and ongoing support.“Despite this remarkable life-changing event, Palesa remains strong and committed to making the most of her new life,” said race director Tanya Harford. “She doesn’t think of herself as a victim and has no sense that her life is now over or less than it was. She’s just making the best of adapting to new challenges.“She is the epitome of the event’s “Ride For A Purpose’ campaign.”Government’s white paperThe White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities will be submitted to the cabinet this month for consideration, said Minister Dlamini.Once approved, it will commit authorities to advancing the rights of people with disabilities by accepting full responsibility and accountability for delivering services to all South Africans, including able-bodied and disabled men and women.“It will also strengthen recourse for persons with disabilities and their families if this does not happen,” the minister said.People with disabilities must be empowered to contribute to the development of their communities, schools, work places and to the country, she added. “Empowerment is identified as a core cross-cutting theme for enabling persons with disabilities to avail of and access all socio-economic development opportunities and rights that exist.”SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

Presidential Campaign Issues: Real Life Vs. Social Media

first_imgTags:#social media 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market The economy, taxes, education, health care, immigration, foreign policy, China, Iran, the military. These are the big campaign issues for Tuesday’s presidential election. But what about the world of social media? Do people care about different things? Yes.Turns out the simple act of using social networks impacts people’s views and involvement in the issue, too. The Pew Research Center reports 25% of social media participants who read about political issues online become more active, and 16% change their view after reading about it online. So what are the top issues on social media?  According to analysis of more than 1.7 million social media posts by the marketing company Vocus, the top campaign issues discussed online are:1. Taxes2. Education3. Budget4. Health Care5. Economy6. AbortionResults were derived from sentiment-analysis software that tracked the tone of tweets and posts to determine what people are feeling. It’s important to note that foreign policy issues aren’t that important on social networks. According to Vocus’ data, China didn’t even crack the top 20. Vocus claims that while traditional media captures the issues that are most important to the masses, social media takes a more accurate pulse on what people online care about. That might not be wrong. Based on the above data, the important issues skew to more personal topics like money, learning and health. And because of social media’s inherent “Me! Me! Look at me!” nature, this makes sense. Meme Value One way these political ideas are spreading is memes, arguably the most dominant online cultural phenomenon of our time, and the vehicle for countless discussions.Big Bird, binders full of women, bayonets and horses, and now, what some are calling the best photo of Obama ever, the meme is an issue itself. And a way to spread an idea like wildfire. Snarky and quirky, yes, but no one can deny its viral value is an important way potential voters learn about issues online. Just measuring the awareness people have of a meme can inform us about which issues are of greatest value. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock adam popescu Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more