SA to spend billions on hospital upgrades

first_img Engineers would provide strategic management of these massive projects, including developing norms and standards for clinics and big hospitals. Motsoaledi said that one of the problems that had led to deterioration in some state hospitals – Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital in particular – was that the department had used doctors to manage infrastructure projects. “We will put massive investment – it will be more than what the country spent during the soccer World Cup,” Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi told reporters at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital in Durban on Monday. 29 September 2010 South Africa is to spend billions of rands on massive upgrades of five of the country’s major public hospitals, using the experience gained in building stadiums for the 2010 Fifa World Cup in implementing the projects. Motsoaledi said the government wanted to use the experience gained in building the 2010 Fifa World Cup stadiums in implementing these projects. Task teams had been put in place to start planning the rebuilding projects at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital, Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital in the Eastern Cape, Dr George Mukhari and Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospitals in Gauteng, and the Limpopo Academic Hospital. In the case of Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, renovation and expansion work began years ago and is far advanced. Located on the outskirts of Soweto, Johannesburg, the hospital is the biggest on the continent, covering 0.7km² and serving approximately 3.5-million people. Motsoaledi said the government had identified infrastructure development as key to transforming health care delivery in South Africa. “This was because of an honest introspection that informed us that we have not done much in the past 16 years,” he said. Hospitals had been chosen as flagship projects in fast-tracking infrastructure development in public health, in part because they provided referral services to mainly rural communities. Motsoaledi also warned that provinces that underspent on their infrastructure budgets would have them taken away. This was in light of a report showing that the provinces have been underspending on their infrastructure budgets over the past five years. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Finally, Maharashtra declares drought in 151 tehsils

first_imgThe Maharashtra government on Wednesday announced severe and medium-scale drought in 151 tehsils in 26 districts. The announcement will hold for the next six months.Out of the 151 tehsils, 39 come under the ‘medium-scale’ category while 112 are ‘severe drought’ areas.Under the Centre’s drought manual of 2016, the State had to follow three steps before declaring a drought.The government identified over 200 tehsils from 13 districts that received rainfall between 50% and 75% and prescribed the first trigger or step, to identify whether drought can be declared in these locations. By the end of the second step, Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis had declared 180 tehsils as drought-prone. A ground truthing [inspection] exercise was held thereafter and the report was submitted to the CM’s office. The Opposition Congress on Tuesday had charged the government for delaying the announcement.The State has been facing water scarcity in October, with the next monsoon still nine months away. Total water storage as on October 31 in all dams of the State stands at 59.46% in comparison to 76.14% last year. The number of tankers deployed across the State too has increased from 74 on October 30, 2017 to 489 on October 29, 2018.The government has already asked District Collectors to not collect land revenue from farmers, implement a 33% subsidy on the electricity bill of agriculture pumps, kick start employment guarantee scheme, and exempt school and college fees for students from these tehsils. Farmers will get financial help ande government is likely to credit ₹6,800 per hectare to farmers with non-irrigated farms and ₹13,000 per hectare to those with irrigated farms.last_img read more