SD woman pleads guilty to smuggling drugs across USMexico border

first_img KUSI Newsroom SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A San Diego woman pleaded guilty today to federal charges related to smuggling large quantities of drugs from Mexico into the United States, including more than 450,000 fentanyl pills.April Spring Kelly, 38, admitted in San Diego federal court that she smuggled the pills, along with methamphetamine and cocaine, through ports of entry in San Diego and Nogales, Arizona. The drugs were then moved to mid-level distributors in San Diego and Phoenix, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.The smuggling occurred between February and October of last year. She also attempted to smuggle drugs through the San Ysidro Port of Entry last Nov. 30, leading to her arrest with around 36 pounds of methamphetamine, 37 pounds of cocaine, and a dozen pounds of powdered fentanyl in her car, according to authorities.Kelly is slated to be sentenced Oct. 11 before U.S. District Judge Janis Sammartino.“San Diego is the gateway for fentanyl to the rest of the country, and we are working aggressively to close that gate, one smuggler and one distributor at a time,” U.S. Attorney Robert Brewer said. SD woman pleads guilty to smuggling drugs across U.S.-Mexico border Posted: July 15, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, July 15, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Backpacker Esquire New Yorker Wired Lead Subdued Ellies

first_imgFour of the magazine industry’s iconic editors—Rolling Stone’s Jann Wenner, Tina Brown, and Vogue’s Anna Wintour and Vanity Fair’s Graydon Carter (left to right, above)—presented photographer Annie Leibovitz (center) with a general excellence Ellie—the first ever to be awarded to an individual, not a magazine.Wenner accepted Rolling Stone’s award for a profile of the late writer and novelist David Foster Wallace, who committed suicide last fall. “David won a National Magazine Award for a piece he did for us years ago,” Wenner said. “He was one of the true talents.”‘Chainsaw-Wielding’Texas Monthly editor Evan Smith delivered the best acceptance speech of the night, thanking everyone from George W. Bush and Karl Rove to “chainsaw-wielding murderers” and Willie Nelson, for making the job of covering the state of Texas an “easy” one. (Texas Monthly won for general excellence, 250,000 to 500,000 circulation.)Despite its elder demographic, AARP the Magazine won an Ellie for best interactive feature online, taking out National Geographic, Salon and Wired.com.After Bicycling won an Ellie, its editor, Loren Mooney, said: “Bicycling? Seriously?!?”There were few other surprises, albeit big ones: Field & Stream won a general excellence award (1,000,000 to 2,000,000 circulation), beating the New Yorker, Vogue and Popular Science.Reader’s Digest, nominated for the first time in 20 years, won a general excellence award  (over 2,000,000 circulation), beating Martha Stewart Living, Real Simple, National Geographic—which won three Ellies last year—and Time.Said editor Peggy Northrop: “This is for all of my friends who said I was crazy for taking this job.” SEE ALSO: FOLIO: Q+A with Northrop [PHOTOS: Steve Friedman] But unlike other years, given the seemingly endless waves of layoffs, magazine closings and reports of hemorrhaging ad pages that have rocked the industry in the last 12 months, this didn’t feel like a celebration.Backpacker, Esquire, Wired and the New Yorker led the awards field, winning three Ellies each.Jimmy Fallon, host of NBC’s Late Night, presented the evening’s first two awards, for excellence online. Backpacker editor Jonathan Dorn, in accepting the Ellie for Backpacker.com, said he hoped it would allow him to keep his job for a year, “maybe two.”“This gives us air cover,” he said.Chris Anderson, accepting Wired’s third Ellie, apologized for his sudden ubiquity: “This is usually the part where [New York magazine editor] Adam Moss or [New Yorker editor] David Remnick start apologizing.”Anderson also thanked his boss at Condé Nast, Si Newhouse, for approving a cover he told Newhouse would “tank.” “Si said, ‘Oh, it doesn’t matter.’” RELATED: FOLIO:’s Ellies Twitter Stream NEW YORK—The 44th annual National Magazine Awards—a normally boozy, raucous affair—were held during a gala ceremony at Jazz @ Lincoln Center here Thursday.last_img read more

Dell nears sale of IT services unit to Japans NTT Data Sources

first_imgDell Inc is set to announce an agreement on Monday to sell its non-core information technology consulting division to Japan’s NTT Data Corp for $3.5 billion, people familiar with the matter said on Sunday.The move will allow U.S. computer maker Dell to trim some of the $43 billion in debt it is taking on to fund its pending cash-and-stock acquisition of data storage provider EMC Corp, a deal worth close to $60 billion.The sale will also offer NTT Data, one of the world’s largest technology services companies, a bigger foothold in the United States, where it is looking to expand in healthcare IT, insurance and financial services consulting.Announcement of any agreement is subject to NTT Data’s board approving the deal when it meets in Tokyo, the people said, asking not to be identified because the transaction is not yet official.Dell has also made progress in syndicating $10 billion of its financing package for the EMC acquisition dubbed ‘term loan A’, the people said. This is expected to be increased in size by $500 million to $750 million due to strong demand, with the extra money to be used to downsize some of the more expensive tranches of the remaining $33 billion in financing, the people added.The group of banks participating in the term loan A has been expanded from the original eight underwriters to 25, with more expected to join before the syndication is completed in the next week, the people said.Dell declined to comment, while NTT Data did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Reuters had reported first on Feb. 12 that NTT Data was in exclusive talks to buy Dell’s IT services unit.Formerly known as Perot Systems, Dell’s IT services division is a major provider of technology consulting to hospitals and government departments. Founded in 1988 by former U.S. presidential candidate Ross Perot, it was acquired by Dell in 2009 for $3.9 billion.However, Dell has since divested some of the unit’s operations and integrated some others, which it is not including in the sale. Some of the unit’s capabilities were seen by Dell as redundant in the wake of the acquisition of EMC.Dell has also been speaking to private equity firms about selling Quest Software, which helps with information technology management, as well as SonicWall, an e-mail encryption and data security provider, Reuters has previously reported. Together, Quest and SonicWall could be worth up to $4 billion.Dell’s acquisition of EMC, which is backed by founder and Chief Excutive Michael Dell as well as private equity firm Silver Lake Partners, is subject to approval by EMC shareholders. EMC is expected to hold a shareholder vote on the Dell deal in May, allowing for the transaction to be completed sometime between July and October.last_img read more

4yrold girl allured by food raped and killed in Badda

first_imgDetectives arrested a suspected rapist-cum-killer in connection with the recovery of a four-year-old girl’s corpse from Badda on Sunday night, reports UNB.The arrestee was identified as Shipon, 35.Police recovered the body of Tanha, 4, daughter of Mehedi, from inside a toilet of a tin-shed house adjacent to Abul Hotel in Adarshanagar area on Sunday evening.Officer-in-charge of Badda police station MA Jalil said that the body bore strangulation mark on its neck and injury marks on both legs.Police sent the body to Dhaka Medical College and Hospital for autopsy, he added.Tanha. File photoThey are primarily suspecting that the girl was raped and later strangled to death, he also said.Meanwhile, briefing reporters at DMP media centre on Monday, joint commissioner (DB) Abdul Baten said the perpetrator reportedly raped the minor girl after alluring her with food.The detectives started shadow investigation alongside local police station soon after the incident came to light on Sunday evening. Acting on a tip-off, a Detective Branch special team arrested Shipon from Badda area on Sunday night, he said.Tanha had been residing at a rented house of Adarshanagar with her parents. Arrested Shipon was one of their neighbours, living in a rented room with his wife.Tanha’s mother. Photo: Abdus SalamShipon had been working as a day labourer, since recently being released from jail after five years. When Tanha was returning home on Thursday crossing Shipon’s room, he pulled Tanha inside his room alluring her with food, and then he allegedly raped her, the joint commissioner of DB said.As Tanha cried out for help, Shipon strangled her, and after the girl died, fled the scene throwing the body of Tanha into a toilet of the house, he said.Mehedi, the father of the ill-fated girl filed a case with Badda police station accusing the arrested Shipon, said Abdul Jalil, the OC of the police station.last_img read more

Its not mild stroke but low blood sugar Quader

first_imgObaidul Quader, Mahbubey AlamAbout the suspicion of Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) chairperson Khaleda Zia’s personal physicians that she has suffered a mild stroke, ruling Bangladesh Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader on Sunday said she fell sick for low blood sugar level, reports UNB.Meanwhile, the attorney general, Mahbubey Alam, also echoed Quader saying Khaleda’s physicians were “spreading it just to get court sympathy”.”I’ve talked to the home minister and IG prisons over the matter. Though Khaleda’s physicians said she might have suffered from mild stroke, the physician of the jail said it is because of fall in her blood sugar level. It’s not a mild stroke,” said Quader, also the road transport and bridges minister.Obaidul was talking to reporters while visiting Dhaka-Tangail highway at Chandra of Gazipur.”We don’t support any negligence in Khaleda’s treatment and she has been requested to go abroad for treatment and undergo medical tests at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) Hospital,” claimed the minister.Talking about the road condition and Eid journey, Quader said the four-lane Chandra-Elenga road will be opened to traffic on 12 June, aiming to ensure the smooth journey of homebound people.Prime minister Sheikh Hasina will inaugurate the road after Eid, he said.Addressing a press briefing at his office after the High Court adjourned the hearing on a petition filed by Khaleda seeking bail in a Cumilla arson case, attorney general Mahbubey Alam dismissed Khaleda’s personal physicians’ claim.”It’s not true that she [Khaleda] had a mild stroke. It’s also not true that she became senseless or remained senseless. She had dizziness following a fall in her blood sugar level.” The BNP chairperson’s four personal physicians on Saturday met Khaleda at the abandoned central jail at Nazimuddin Road.”Khaleda Zia collapsed on the ground on 5 June but she cannot recall anything of the incident. We think she suffered a mild stroke,” professor SM Siddique of Dhaka Medical College Hospital’s medicine department told reporters.”I talked to the Inspector General (Prisons) before going to court today when he told me that Khaleda Zia’s sugar level dropped just before iftar on 5 June. But it’s not true that she became senseless. She had just giddiness. Instantly, she was fed with chocolate,” said the attorney general.”The IG (Prisons) and the Civil Surgeon would have been informed surely had she become senseless. They (BNP) are trying to mobilise public opinion using the issue,” he said.Mahbubey Alam smelt something fishy in physicians’ visit to the BNP chief just one day before the hearing on a case. “It’s shameful that physicians who should not be involved in politics are saying that she [Khaleda] remained senseless for 7-8 minutes,” he added.Meanwhile, law minister Anisul Huq and home minister Asaduzzaman Khan said BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia will be sent to BSMMU for medical tests following her personal physicians’ claim of mild stroke.last_img read more

US says N Korea begging for war pushes sanctions

first_imgNorth Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (C) looking at a metal casing with two bulges at an undisclosed location. AFP file photoThe US has accused North Korea of “begging for war” and pushed for the “strongest possible measures” on Pyongyang following its sixth and most powerful nuclear test.As world powers scramble to react to the latest grave step in the North’s rogue weapons programme, South Korea launched major live-fire naval drills to warn its isolated neighbour against any provocations at sea Tuesday morning local time.US Ambassador Nikki Haley told an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council that Washington will present a new sanctions resolution to be negotiated in the coming days, with a view to voting on it next Monday.“Only the strongest sanctions will enable us to resolve this problem through diplomacy,” Haley told the meeting Monday called by the United States, Britain, France, Japan and South Korea.North Korea on Sunday triggered global alarm when it detonated what it described as a hydrogen bomb designed for a long-range missile.The underground blast had a yield of between 50 and 100 kilotons, or on average more than five times more powerful than the bomb detonated over Hiroshima, UN political affairs chief Jeffrey Feltman told the council.Declaring that “enough is enough,” Haley said incremental sanctions imposed on Pyongyang since 2006 had failed.Leader Kim Jong-Un’s “abusive use of missiles and his nuclear threats show that he is begging for war,” she said.“War is never something the United States wants and we don’t want it now, but our country’s patience is not unlimited,” she said.‘Insulting’Haley did not spell out what measures Washington was seeking, but diplomats said they could target oil supplies to North Korea—potentially dealing a major blow to the economy.New sanctions could also seek to curb tourism to the country and ban North Korean laborers sent abroad.The draft text was expected to be presented to the 14 other council members on Tuesday as the United States sought to respond quickly to reports that North Korea was preparing another missile launch.Pyongyang in July fired two intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) that apparently brought much of the US mainland into range and Seoul has said it could be planning another test.At the UN, China’s ambassador Liu Jieyi warned that the crisis was worsening and emphasized the need for dialogue and a diplomatic solution.“China will never allow chaos and war on the (Korean) peninsula,” he asserted.Liu urged the parties to agree to a Chinese-Russian plan calling for the North to freeze its missile and nuclear tests and the United States and South Korea to suspend joint military exercises.Haley rejected the proposal as “insulting.”“When a rogue regime has a nuclear weapon and an ICBM pointed at you, you do not take steps to lower your guard. No one would do that. We certainly won’t,” she declared.Russia said it would study the new US proposals for sanctions, but again stressed those measures alone would not resolve the crisis.“This is not the way to get parties to the table to seek a political solution,” said Russian Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia.The council has imposed seven sets of sanctions on North Korea since it first tested a nuclear device in 2006, but Pyongyang has repeatedly found ways to circumvent the measures.The most recent resolutions, however, have zeroed in on the economy, targeting key exports sectors such as coal that are a source of hard currency for the regime.Haley reiterated US threats to impose sanctions on countries that conduct trade with North Korea, saying these nations will be seen as “giving aid to their reckless and dangerous nuclear intentions”.That could have major reverberations: China is the largest trading partner of both the North and the United States.South Korean responseSouth Korea’s defense ministry said it was already strengthening its defenses, in part by deploying more US-made Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile launchers.The South carried out an early-morning volley of ballistic missiles Monday simulated an attack on the North’s nuclear test site, followed Tuesday by the naval drills.US President Donald Trump and South Korean leader Moon Jae-In spoke on the phone Monday and agreed to remove limits on the payload of the South’s missiles, fixed at 500 kilograms according to a 2001 bilateral agreement.Trump also approved in principle, the sale of “many billions of dollars’ worth of military weapons and equipment from the United States by South Korea,” according to a White House readout of the call which did not mention any specific new deals.Seoul was the fourth-biggest importer of US arms between 2010-2016, purchasing nearly $5 billion of weaponry in that period according to an analysis by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.On Sunday US monitors measured a powerful 6.3-magnitude earthquake near the North’s main testing site.Hours before the test, the North released images of Kim inspecting a device it called a “thermonuclear weapon with super explosive power” entirely made “by our own efforts and technology”.The South’s defence minister said Seoul believed the North had succeeded in miniaturising a bomb to fit into a missile.The North says it needs nuclear weapons to defend itself against the threat of invasion, and analysts say it is seeking to strengthen its hand for any future negotiations with Washington.last_img read more

Man Who Died from Ebola Endured Treatment Delays

first_imgHealth workers in protective suits transport Dr. Martin Salia, a surgeon working in Sierra Leone who had been diagnosed with Ebola, from a jet that brought him from Sierra Leone to a waiting ambulance that will take him to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014. Dr. Salia is the third Ebola patient at the Omaha hospital and the 10th person with Ebola to be treated in the U.S. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A surgeon who contracted Ebola in his native Sierra Leone did not receive aggressive treatment until nearly two weeks after he first started showing symptoms — a delay that doctors said probably made it impossible for anyone to save his life.Dr. Martin Salia was in the 13th day of his illness when he reached Omaha on Saturday. He had waited three days to be formally diagnosed after an initial test for Ebola came back negative. He then waited five more days to be flown to the United States.By the time the 44-year-old Maryland man got to the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, the deadly virus had done too much damage, shutting down Salia’s kidneys and making breathing difficult, doctors said. He died Monday.“In the very advanced stages, even the modern techniques we have at our disposal are not enough to help these patients once they reach a critical threshold,” said Dr. Jeffrey Gold, chancellor of the medical center.The virus has already killed more than 5,000 people in West Africa.Salia, who chose to work in his homeland despite more lucrative opportunities elsewhere, was first tested for Ebola on Nov. 7, but the test was negative, and he was discharged from a treatment center in Sierre Leone.It’s not unusual to see false negative tests for Ebola in the early stages because the amount of the virus in the bloodstream is still low, said Dr. Phil Smith, the infectious-disease expert who leads the Nebraska Medical Center’s biocontainment unit.The U.S. government warns doctors to be wary of possible false negative tests for Ebola.Salia tested positive for the disease on Nov. 10 but did not arrive at an Omaha hospital until Saturday.Two other Ebola patients treated in Omaha this fall arrived at the hospital roughly a week earlier in their illnesses, before nausea, vomiting and more serious symptoms set in. Both of those men recovered.Government officials in Sierra Leone promised a full investigation into the treatment Salia received.“At this point, we can’t say for certain whether it was this misdiagnosis or not that led to his death,” Deputy Information Minister Theo Nicol said in a statement to The Associated Press. The government planned to request a full medical report from the hospital where he was last treated.In this April 2014 photo provided by the United Methodist News Service, Dr. Martin Salia poses for a photo at the United Methodist Church’s Kissy Hospital outside Freetown, Sierra Leone. Salia who was diagnosed with Ebola on Monday, landed at Eppley Airfield in Omaha, Neb., Saturday, Nov. 17, 2014, and was being transported to the Nebraska Medical Center. (AP Photo/United Methodist News Service, Mike DuBose)Salia, a permanent U.S. resident, was reportedly receiving blood from an Ebola survivor while in Sierra Leone, the government statement said. The treatment is believed to provide antibodies to fight the virus.The government statement questioned whether “the strain of the 16-hour trip could have had a negative impact on his recovery.”Doctors with an air-transport service assessed Salia in Sierra Leone last week before deciding he was stable enough for the long flight to Nebraska.In Omaha, Salia was placed on kidney dialysis and a ventilator and was given several medications, the hospital said. He was given the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp and received another plasma transfusion from an Ebola survivor.“I know that we gave him every possible chance to survive. I think that his family feels confident in that as well,” Dr. Daniel Johnson said Monday at a news conference.Salia’s wife, Isatu Salia, who lives in New Carrollton, Maryland, said Monday that the family believed he was treated “in the best place possible.”But by the time her husband arrived in Omaha, he was already unresponsive, doctors said.In a Friday telephone interview, she said she had spoken to her husband and prayed with him. Although his voice sounded weak and shaky, she said he told her “I love you” in a steady voice.Salia graduated from the Pan African Academy of Christian Surgeons training program in 2008. He was free to practice anywhere he wanted, but he chose to stay in Sierra Leone, where the need for surgeons is immense.“He honestly believed that’s what God wanted him to do,” said Bruce Steffes, executive director of the academy.Salia was a member of a United Brethren Church congregation in Sierra Leone, and the church helped support his medical training.Jeff Bleijerveld, director of global ministries for the church, knew Salia through missionary work. He said Salia’s death is a testament to “his Christian faith, his willingness to, if necessary, lay down his life for others.”___Associated Press writers Nedra Pickler in Washington, D.C., Clarence Roy-Macaulay in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Nelson Lampe in Omaha, Nebraska, and Krista Larson in Dakar, Senegal, contributed to this report.last_img read more