Heres what you need to know about the 5 billion FacebookFTC settlement

first_img Tags Facebook reached a record $5 billion settlement with the FTC this week. Graphic by Pixabay/Illustration by CNET After more than a year of wrangling, Facebook and the Federal Trade Commission finally agreed to settle an investigation into the social network’s privacy mishaps. The result: Facebook will create a new privacy council, CEO Mark Zuckerberg will be required to certify the company’s behavior, and the social network will have to — we sort of can’t believe we have to write this but we do — encrypt your password.Oh, yeah. There was also a $5 billion fine, a penalty the FTC called “unprecedented.”The settlement comes after the FTC looked into whether Facebook should have done more to prevent Cambridge Analytica, a now-defunct consultancy that worked on President Donald Trump’s campaign, from siphoning off the data of up to 87 million users. Specifically, the FTC was concerned that Facebook’s failure to safeguard that data violated an earlier agreement Facebook made to protect user privacy. Here’s all you need to know about the settlement and how it impacts you.I’m a Facebook user. How do I get some of that $5 billion?Short answer: You don’t. Longer answer: Facebook users weren’t financially harmed, though being hammered with political ads might seem like it deserves compensation. So no fund is being set up to pay victims. Instead the money will go straight to the US Treasury.We know that’s disappointing, particularly if you’ve been following the $700 million settlement that Equifax struck after it was hacked. On Monday, the FTC said the 147 million Equifax customers whose data was swiped could claim compensation for costs caused by the security breach, including unauthorized charges to your account and money spent to protect yourself from the threat of identity theft. About $300 million from the settlement will be set aside to pay consumers affected by the hack.Well, that’s disappointing. What’s this about a new privacy committee?The agreement requires Facebook to form a privacy committee at the board-of-directors level. The committee will do one thing: oversee privacy at Facebook. And all the members will be independent, meaning their day jobs can’t be at Facebook. 18 Photos 0 3:28 Post a comment Politics Tech Industry Now playing: Watch this: The committee, when it is created, will have a lot of power. It will be able to remove privacy compliance officers, who will be responsible for executing the company’s policies. It will also be able to fire the company’s privacy assessor, a newly created position that will evaluate Facebook’s policies and produce a report every two years. (The committee will need the FTC’s approval to remove the assessor.) The committee members are also well protected. A member can only be fired without cause by a supermajority of voting shares.I heard something about a new privacy program at Facebook. What’s that about?In broad brush, Facebook has to conduct privacy reviews of all new or modified products and services. That could be apps it designs or physical products, like its Portal video chat device. The company has to share written privacy reviews with Zuck (which seems like common sense), as well as the assessor and the FTC, if it wants to have a peek. The privacy program has to include other Facebook services, such as WhatsApp and Instagram.So Zuck is on the hook?Yes, for anything that happens in the future. The settlement requires him to certify that Facebook is in compliance with its privacy program every quarter. He could face “civil and criminal penalties” if he doesn’t or gets it wrong. He also isn’t the boss of the independent privacy committee or assessor.Anything else I need to know about the settlement?There are some interesting — and scary — loose ends. The social network has to encrypt user passwords, can’t use phone numbers given as part of two-factor authentication for advertising, can’t retain personal information that users deleted on its servers and can’t let employees have free access to user information.That’s it, right?As long as you don’t count the controls that are being put in place for facial recognition. Basically it boils down to this: Facebook has to get your permission on facial recognition matters before it does anything. What comes next?Facebook is still facing regulatory scrutiny from the FTC and other government agencies. The FTC told the company in June it was investigating the social media giant for antitrust concerns. The Department of Justice also said this week that it’s kicking off an antitrust review into internet giants and how they achieved market power, signaling it would target social media companies like Facebook. Facebook FTC settlement puts Zuck personally on the hook Share your voice Facebook’s video calling smart display connects you with friends and family Privacy Facebook FTClast_img read more

New Research Reveals Undocumented Immigrants Do Not Increase Crime Rates

first_img X 00:00 /00:57 Listen Immigration and Customs EnforcementICE arrested hundreds of undocumented workers in the Dallas area in a rare crackdown on workers.New analysis of nationwide data reveals that undocumented immigrants do not bring more crime to their communities.  The study, by the Marshall Project and the New York Times, looked at whether shifts in the undocumented population are connected with rates of different types of crime.center_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: The nationwide analysis, which included data from 17 Texas cities, showed that the share of undocumented immigrants in cities is not correlated with a shift in crime rates.Data journalist Anna Flagg headed up the project, which used Pew Research estimates of the undocumented population. “Since 2007, violent and property crimes have decreased across most areas and it has decreased at similar rates regardless of whether the undocumented population has gone up or gone down,” said Flagg. In Houston, the share of the population that was undocumented decreased slightly from 2007 to 2016. Though crime rates also decreased, Flagg said it’s important to look at the big picture.“We’re seeing that overall crime rates are decreasing everywhere and they’re decreasing similarly no matter what happened with the undocumented population in that area,” she said. Houston and Dallas have the third and fourth largest undocumented populations in the country, each city with some 500,000 people. Sharelast_img read more

Google engineers to pump up MOOCorg website from edX

first_img What will Google bring to the project? Google will work on core platform development. Google’s Dan Clancy, Director of Research, said Tuesday, “We are taking our learnings from Course Builder and applying them to Open edX” for the latter’s new platform.By Course Builder, Clancy is referring to the open source experimental platform that Google started in 2012 with the similar spirit of support for online learning, providing the tools for those who want to create an interactive online course. Though it was Google’s first step into this kind of project, Course Builder attracted a community of education-focused people around the world. In 2014, however, the edX alphabet soup is going to have a key main ingredient, yet another catchy phrase to watch, called MOOC.org. This will go live in 2014 with courses.”We look forward to contributing to edX’s new site, MOOC.org, a new service for online learning which will allow any academic institution, business and individual to create and host online courses.” said Clancy. For those involved in Course Builder, questions remain as to what next year’s MOOC.org means for them. Google’s Clancy said Google will provide “an upgrade path to Open edX and MOOC.org from Course Builder.”According to the Course Builder site, in a notice titled Hi Course Builder community, “As we transition our focus to Open edX, we will minimize Course Builder feature development. However, we are committed to providing support to current and future Course Builder users in the interim.” For anyone who has customized Course Builder, “we cannot guarantee that these will transfer to Open edX. However, Open edX has a customization framework called XBlocks that may address some of these needs. Additionally, as an open source platform, Open edX can be customized at the source code level.”Meanwhile, Anant Agarwal, president of edX, welcomes the Google move because of the opportunity to work with Google’s world-class engineers and technology, which “will enable us to advance online, on-campus and blended learning experiences faster and more effectively than ever before.” The new site is to invite contributions not only from schools but businesses and individual course authors and instructors. MOOC is shorthand for Massive Open Online Courses. (Phys.org) —Free online courses continue to be a work in progress as the next upheaval in education. Google will be advancing progress momentum, based on Tuesday’s announcement from Google Research: Google is joining the Open edX platform. To get some of this lingo soup out of the way, we start with Open edX, which is a platform for creating courses that can be taken by anyone with Internet access. Behind this open source learning platform is edX, a group of 28 institutions, the xConsortium. Founded by Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, edX is dedicated to transforming online and campus learning. A nonprofit, edX distributes online courses for free. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img More top universities to offer free online courses Citation: Google engineers to pump up MOOC.org website from edX (2013, September 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-09-google-moocorg-website-edx.html More information: groups.google.com/forum/?fromg … announce/vtW1KiK5_Kcmooc.org/index.htmlgoogleresearch.blogspot.com/20 … en-edx-platform.htmlcode.google.com/p/course-builder/last_img read more