Access Intelligence Acquires Red 7 Media

first_imgRockville, MD—B-to-b media company Access Intelligence announced today the acquisition of Red 7 Media, owner of Folio: Magazine and several other leading media brands. With the acquisition, AI strengthens its position in the media communications markets and will create a new division combining the Folio: and min brands. The new unit, AI’s media and event marketing group, will be led by Red 7 Media CEO Kerry Smith and his senior management team. Smith will continue in his role as president of the expanded Red 7 Media group and become a senior vice president of Access Intelligence.“The ability to round out our leading position in the consumer magazine market with Red 7’s events, online communities and a leading magazine while expanding into the dynamic events business is a truly exciting prospect for Access Intelligence, our employees and customers,” said Don Pazour, president and CEO of Access Intelligence. Smith founded Red 7 Media in 2002 and grew the Norwalk, CT-based company into a market leader, attracting more than 7,000 executives and 500 sponsors to its events and more than 800,000 unique visitors to its Web sites.  Other Red 7 brands include Event Marketer, Event Design, Audience Development, Expo and Best Events. The Red 7 Media group will serve the media and events industries through conferences, consulting, magazines, newsletters and online communities. Together with AI’s positions in cable television programming, public relations, and digital graphics, this transaction, representing about a third of the company’s revenue, makes Access Intelligence a major voice in media communications.The acquisition marks Access Intelligence’s continued investment in high-performing properties with engaged audiences and best-in-class products and services. Smith noted that he has an existing relationship with Pazour through SISO—the Society of Independent Show Organizers—and through Veronis Suhler Stevenson, the media-industry private-equity firm that has investments in both companies. “Don’s team and ours share a vision for creating high-value business resources around market-leading brands. Integrating Red 7 Media into Access Intelligence will provide Red 7 with deep resources and capabilities that will enable us to accelerate our growth strategies and better serve our customers and employees,” he said. “I couldn’t think of a leader or company that would be a better fit for our brands, our vision, and our employees.”last_img read more

Land OLakes Copernicus Project Humans arent the center of the food universe

first_img1:28 • See All Culture In the middle of a sprawling conference and festival like SXSW, Land O’Lakes is also one of many companies vying for the attention of folks looking for the next, large, colorful, interactive experience to duck into and maybe even snap some pics for Instagram.The Copernicus Project also let goers do things like see how they stack up in their perceptions of food issues. For example, they could take a small spool of yarn color-coded to their diet (vega, carnivore, omnivore, etc) and wrap it around pegs in order to indicate how much they think the average meal costs, or what the most pressing food challenge is: Scarcity? Food safety? Global hunger?And if attendees would consider adding bugs to their diet as a protein source, for example, they could have voted with a small yellow plastic ball.  Share your voice The Copernicus Project reminds SXSW attendees they’re not the center of the food universe.  Land O’Lakes At an interactive experience called The Copernicus Project by Land O’Lakes, South by Southwest festivalgoers got some food for thought.Tying art installations into topics like biodiversity and nanotechnology meant that attendees could stand inside a room with floor-to-ceiling LED screens to get facts about where our food comes from, or slide into a giant avocado ball pit while pretending to be a nanobot. “People learn when they touch things,” said Land O’Lakes CTO Teddy Bekele.The thinking behind the name of the installation, which ended Sunday night, comes from the idea that Nicolaus Copernicus said the Earth wasn’t the center of the universe. Similarly, Land O’Lakes wants folks to know humans aren’t the center of the food universe. Now playing: Watch this: reading • Land O’Lakes’ Copernicus Project: Humans aren’t the center of the food universe Mar 15 • LG ‘Snow White’ makes ice cream from capsules SXSW 2019 Mar 20 • Us review: Jordan Peele’s horror flick holds up a dark mirror to Get Out Tags Mar 19 • AOC, Bill Nye and the apocalypse: The insanity of SXSW 2019 Mar 15 • Men can now breastfeed SXSW 2019 0 Land O’Lakes’ Copernicus Project lets you get hands on… Post a commentlast_img read more

Sri Lanka speaker refuses to accept Rajapaksa as prime minister

first_imgKaru Jayasuriya, speaker of the parliament of Sri Lanka, attend a party leaders and members meeting at the parliament in Colombo, Sri Lanka 2 November 2018.Photo: ReutersSri Lanka’s speaker of parliament said on Monday he would not accept a former president, Mahinda Rajapaksa, as the new prime minister until he proves he commands a majority in parliament.President Maithripala Sirisena fired the sitting prime minister, Ranil Wickremesinghe, on 26 October and appointed Rajapaksa in his place, sparking a political crisis.Wickremesinghe has denounced his dismissal as unconstitutional and vowed to remain prime minister until parliament votes him out.”The majority of members are of the view that the changes … are unconstitutional and against traditions,” the speaker of parliament, Karu Jayasuriya, said in a statement.Sirisena suspended parliament after he appointed Rajapaksa, raising concern among political parties at home and among Sri Lanka’s traditional allies such as India, the United States and European Union.Rajapaksa is known as a Sri Lankan nationalist, while being close to China.He is seen as a hero by many among Sri Lanka’s Buddhist majority but has been accused by diplomats of serious human rights abuses in the war against rebels from the Tamil minority, which ended during his tenure as president, in 2009.He has denied abuses and said in a statement after he was sworn in he wanted to end religious and ethnic divisions in the country of 21 million people.Jayasuriya said most members of parliament had called on him not to accept the changes.”I will have to accept the status quo prior to the changes” until a majority in parliament accepted them, he said.On Friday, 118 members of the 225-seat legislature met the speaker and called for the reconvening of parliament. On Sunday, Sirisena said parliament would be recalled on 14 November.Jayasuriya said it was difficult for him to remain silent when the norms of democracy and the rights of a majority of members of parliament had been violated.Foreign Minister Sarath Amunugama told a news conference Jayasuriya was not being impartial.The European Union warned last week it will consider stripping Sri Lanka of its duty-free access if it backs off commitments on human rights, amid worries stoked by the appointment of Rajapaksa.The United States and Japan have put some aid to Sri Lanka on hold because of the political crisis, Sri Lankan government officials have said.Sirisena has said Wickremesinghe was removed after his cabinet was dissolved in line with the constitution, but Wickremesinghe loyalists say it was unconstitutional.last_img read more

Air Pollution vs People of Color

first_imgBy Brianna McAdoo, Special to the AFROAs the 2020 race for Presidency of the United States unfolds, climate change is amongst one of the most pressing issues that the candidates are being asked to share their plan of action for. Americans across the United States are collectively acknowledging the climate crisis that has been unfolding over the years, 53 percent of Americans identify global warming as an “urgent problem that requires immediate government action,” according to a 2018 survey conducted by Langer Research Associates. Accordingly to the Union of Concerned Scientists, people of color are being disproportionately affected by global warming due to alarmingly high exposure of PM2.5, a dangerous air pollutant. (Courtesy Photo)While the collective consciousness in America and throughout the world is building around the climate crisis, there is an urgent need to recognize that people of color in America are disproportionately left the most vulnerable to the effects of global warming and climate change. The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) have released a new study that highlights the disproportionately detrimental implications of air pollution on Asian American, Latino and African Americans in the District of Columbia. The UCS Air Quality Report looks at the alarmingly high exposure of PM2.5, a dangerous air pollutant. PM2.5 is an air pollutant that is about 2.5 microns or less. The pollutant can be emitted into the air through the burning of both diesel and gasoline fuel. Due to its size, PM2.5 can spread rapidly and easily into one’s bloodstreams and can cause short term effects including irritation, sneezing, coughing and trouble breathing. The air pollutant is also known to put people in jeopardy of long term health effects including respiratory and cardiovascular issues, some of which have resulted in hospitalization and deaths. Children, the elderly and people with a history of respiratory and heart problems are at higher risk if exposed to PM2.5. The report will provide more detail about the exposure levels of PM2.5 in these communities of color in Washington D.C. in addition to more details about the source of exposure, a way forward for a more environmentally friendly transportation system and the District’s involvement in the Transportation & Climate Initiative.For more information about the Union of Concerned Scientists, you can visit www.ucsusa.org.last_img read more