Party Leaders faceoff in fierce debate

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, December 6, 2016 – The Leaders Debate was a fierce challenge last night as Rufus Ewing, Sharlene Robinson and Oswald Skippings aimed to woo any undecided voters through their answers to questions which came from moderators and the audience.Reputation and Integrity, Experience and Ability, Fact or Fiction and Vision for the country were among the broad subjects coming through a variety of questions from Tremmaine Harvey, Trevor Musgrove and Kenrick Walters who moderated the three hour PTV & Shaun Malcolm organized debate.PNP Leader, Rufus Ewing spent much of his time being double-teamed and defending or explaining the accomplishments of his administration over the past four years – he warned voters not to buy into the ‘doom and gloom’ messages from his opponents and touted accomplishments including the economic standing and health care model of the TCI as being top and envies of the region.PDM Leader, Sharlene Robinson, the lone lady on the panel directed her focus to the PNP mainly, and on several occasions chided the premier for complaining about the British; for keeping important information to himself; reminding that the PNP is the reason for UK intervention and the need for a bail-out loan and essentially calling his leadership, failed.She told voters that if their lives are not better, to vote for change.  PDA Leader, Oswald Skippings reflected on his two terms as Chief Minister with a record of building sports, education, saving a straddled economy in 1988 and with ideas on attracting inward investment.Mr. Skippings spoke to the voters about his experience and effectiveness to get the British to do more about national security and to uncover the problems of what he believes is a crippled health care system.Tonight, another debate to air on Ch2 on the Digicel network; it features the All Island At Large Candidates, well except for Michael Misick who in a press release explained that he will not participate because he feels all independent candidates should have the opportunity.  Misick said to leave the three district independent candidates out; namely: Valarie Jennings; his pal, McAllister Hanchell and JJ Parker – is disadvantageous to the trio and he will not support the face off. Related Items:last_img read more

Local comic creator to help Navy servicemembers with donations at ComicCon

first_img Anne Elizabeth is a local comic book artist and Navy SEAL wife who has had comics featured on the The Big Bang Theory nine times.This year, Anne will be collecting comics and action figures to send to active duty U.S. Navy servicemembers. Find her at booth #2201 on the Comic Con International exhibitor floor.She is being honored for a second time for her services to others with the RWA’s Service Award. People receive the award because of their work teaching and mentoring others as well as for promoting writing and strong heroes and heroines. Find out more about Anne at AnneElizabeth.net.  Posted: July 18, 2017 Local comic creator to help Navy servicemembers with donations at Comic-Con July 18, 2017 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News, San Diego Comic-Con 2017 FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

California leaders opposed to Sanctuary law meet with President Trump

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Donald Trump, Kristin Gaspar FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — City and county officials from across the state who oppose California’s sanctuary-state law sat down with President Donald Trump Wednesday to voice their objections to the law, and they got a pep talk from the president who slammed the state for failing to crack down on illegal immigration.The officials, including San Diego County Supervisor Kristin Gaspar, hailed from counties and cities that have taken stances against the law, some by joining or filing briefs in support of a Trump administration lawsuit challenging it.“Each of you has bravely resisted California’s deadly and unconstitutional sanctuary state laws,” Trump told the group gathered in Washington, D.C. “You’ve gone through a lot, too, although it’s becoming quite popular what you’re doing. A law that forces the release of illegal immigrant criminals, drug dealers, gang members and violent predators into your communities.“California’s law provides safe harbor to some of the most vicious and violent offenders on Earth, like MS-13 gang members putting innocent men, women and children at the mercy of sadistic criminals,” Trump said.Trump lashed out in particular at the Los Angeles Police Department, saying the agency in January “arrested an illegal immigrant from Mexico for drug possession.”“Instead of honoring the (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) detainer, they set him free,” Trump said. “Just a few weeks later, he was arrested again, this time for murder. So they arrested him, they had him, they let him go … and he killed somebody. And it’s happening more and more.”Trump did not give specifics about the case.The president then listened as each of the officials attending the meeting praised the work his administration is doing to address illegal immigration and discussed their municipalities’ efforts to challenge the sanctuary state law.“The fact that we have this unsecured border is putting all of us at risk because we know that terrorists are coming in,” San Juan Capistrano City Councilwoman Pam Patterson said.Los Alamitos Mayor Troy Edgar, whose city’s move to officially oppose the law sparked other conservative-leaning cities and municipalities to do the same, also hailed Trump’s efforts and went so far as to ask for help fending off a lawsuit by the ACLU.“Coming out first has a price to pay, and the ACLU has filed a lawsuit against us,” Edgar said. “You know, we would really appreciate any direct or indirect funding, any sort of fiscal help you could provide for us.”Trump assured Edgar that “we’re with you 100 percent” and said “if it’s at all possible” he would like to help the city fight the lawsuit.Los Alamitos in March approved an ordinance claiming an exemption from the sanctuary state law, which limits cooperation between local authorities and federal immigration officials.The ACLU sued, arguing the ordinance “authorizes local police officers and school officials, as well as other local officials, to disregard the terms of the Values Act and collaborate with immigration authorities. It is black-letter law that a locality cannot enact an ordinance that conflicts with state law — let alone one that, on its face, authorizes local officials toviolate state law. A local ordinance is preempted by state law, and therefore invalid, when it `duplicates, contradicts or enters an area fully occupied by general law, either expressly or by legislative implication.”’Responding to the meeting, Gov. Jerry Brown wrote on his Twitter page that Trump “is lying on immigration, lying about crime and lying about the laws of CA. Flying in a dozen Republican politicians to flatter him and praise his reckless policies changes nothing. We, the citizens of the fifth largest economy in the world, are not impressed.”Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Department of Homeland Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Thomas Homan are also expected to attend the meeting, according to the White House.California leaders attending the meeting with Trump were:House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-BakersfieldAssemblywoman Melissa Melendez, R-Lake ElsinoreCouncilwoman Pam Patterson, of San Juan CapistranoMayor Troy Edgar, city of Los AlamitosMayor Julie Hackbarth-McIntyre, BarstowMayor Natasha Johnson, Lake ElsinoreMayor Elaine Gennawey, Laguna NiguelMayor Crystal Ruiz, San JacintoMayor Sam Abed, EscondidoMayor Pro Tem Warren Kusumoto, Los AlamitosSheriff Adam Christianson, Stanislaus CountySheriff Margaret Mims, Fresno CountySupervisor Michelle Steel, Orange CountySupervisor Kristin Gaspar, San Diego CountyDeputy Sheriff Ray Grangoff, Orange CountyDistrict Attorney Stacey Montgomery, Lassen County KUSI Newsroom, May 16, 2018 KUSI Newsroom center_img Updated: 2:34 PM Posted: May 16, 2018 California leaders opposed to Sanctuary law meet with President Trumplast_img

Strengthening tech security around the holidays

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – “Smart tech” devices are among the top gift items this year, according to the Consumer Technology Association.Ryland Madison, Director of Product Management at Cox Communications, visited Good Morning San Diego to bring awareness to the importance of protecting your technology.According to the CTA, technology spending during the 2018 holiday season will reach $96.1 billion in revenue in the United States.Some advice from Cox Communications:· Change passwords regularly, and be sure to change the default password for each device. These default passwords can often be found online with an easy search.· Use two-factor authentication or use a password generator that will provide you a random code to use. Don’t write down your passwords.· Keep software updated. Learn how to update it as soon as you bring it home. Don’t ignore the update notifications you may receive, and also do an online search periodically to find any updates you may be missing. The updates often provide security patches to deal with identified vulnerabilities.· Be aware of the “trade-offs” – because they track behaviors, data around home life can be a commodity. – so read the fine print (i.e. terms of service) and know what you are signing up for.· Consider setting up a separate wi-fi network for just your smart home / home automation devices.· Do your research, read reviews – does the company you are buying from update their software enough to protect from the latest threats? You want to make sure they have a strong reputation. Do they push the update to the device, or do you have to download it?· Stick to well-known brands – especially when it comes to smart speakers, and make sure they have a physical mute button. Off brands may not, and they are not easily bypassed. Sometimes it’s best to wait to adopt smart home tech when it is in its second or third generation. Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: December 6, 2018 KUSI Newsroom December 6, 2018 Strengthening tech security around the holidays KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

Heres what you need to know about the 5 billion FacebookFTC settlement

first_img Tags Facebook reached a record $5 billion settlement with the FTC this week. Graphic by Pixabay/Illustration by CNET After more than a year of wrangling, Facebook and the Federal Trade Commission finally agreed to settle an investigation into the social network’s privacy mishaps. The result: Facebook will create a new privacy council, CEO Mark Zuckerberg will be required to certify the company’s behavior, and the social network will have to — we sort of can’t believe we have to write this but we do — encrypt your password.Oh, yeah. There was also a $5 billion fine, a penalty the FTC called “unprecedented.”The settlement comes after the FTC looked into whether Facebook should have done more to prevent Cambridge Analytica, a now-defunct consultancy that worked on President Donald Trump’s campaign, from siphoning off the data of up to 87 million users. Specifically, the FTC was concerned that Facebook’s failure to safeguard that data violated an earlier agreement Facebook made to protect user privacy. Here’s all you need to know about the settlement and how it impacts you.I’m a Facebook user. How do I get some of that $5 billion?Short answer: You don’t. Longer answer: Facebook users weren’t financially harmed, though being hammered with political ads might seem like it deserves compensation. So no fund is being set up to pay victims. Instead the money will go straight to the US Treasury.We know that’s disappointing, particularly if you’ve been following the $700 million settlement that Equifax struck after it was hacked. On Monday, the FTC said the 147 million Equifax customers whose data was swiped could claim compensation for costs caused by the security breach, including unauthorized charges to your account and money spent to protect yourself from the threat of identity theft. About $300 million from the settlement will be set aside to pay consumers affected by the hack.Well, that’s disappointing. What’s this about a new privacy committee?The agreement requires Facebook to form a privacy committee at the board-of-directors level. The committee will do one thing: oversee privacy at Facebook. And all the members will be independent, meaning their day jobs can’t be at Facebook. 18 Photos 0 3:28 Post a comment Politics Tech Industry Now playing: Watch this: The committee, when it is created, will have a lot of power. It will be able to remove privacy compliance officers, who will be responsible for executing the company’s policies. It will also be able to fire the company’s privacy assessor, a newly created position that will evaluate Facebook’s policies and produce a report every two years. (The committee will need the FTC’s approval to remove the assessor.) The committee members are also well protected. A member can only be fired without cause by a supermajority of voting shares.I heard something about a new privacy program at Facebook. What’s that about?In broad brush, Facebook has to conduct privacy reviews of all new or modified products and services. That could be apps it designs or physical products, like its Portal video chat device. The company has to share written privacy reviews with Zuck (which seems like common sense), as well as the assessor and the FTC, if it wants to have a peek. The privacy program has to include other Facebook services, such as WhatsApp and Instagram.So Zuck is on the hook?Yes, for anything that happens in the future. The settlement requires him to certify that Facebook is in compliance with its privacy program every quarter. He could face “civil and criminal penalties” if he doesn’t or gets it wrong. He also isn’t the boss of the independent privacy committee or assessor.Anything else I need to know about the settlement?There are some interesting — and scary — loose ends. The social network has to encrypt user passwords, can’t use phone numbers given as part of two-factor authentication for advertising, can’t retain personal information that users deleted on its servers and can’t let employees have free access to user information.That’s it, right?As long as you don’t count the controls that are being put in place for facial recognition. Basically it boils down to this: Facebook has to get your permission on facial recognition matters before it does anything. What comes next?Facebook is still facing regulatory scrutiny from the FTC and other government agencies. The FTC told the company in June it was investigating the social media giant for antitrust concerns. The Department of Justice also said this week that it’s kicking off an antitrust review into internet giants and how they achieved market power, signaling it would target social media companies like Facebook. Facebook FTC settlement puts Zuck personally on the hook Share your voice Facebook’s video calling smart display connects you with friends and family Privacy Facebook FTClast_img read more

Pearson Sells Financial Times to Japans Nikkei in Rs 83 Billion Deal

first_imgJapanese media group Nikkei has agreed to buy the Financial Times from Britain’s Pearson (PSON.L) for $1.3 billion, putting one of the world’s premier business newspapers in the hands of a company influential at home but little known outside Japan.The deal, struck after Nikkei beat Germany’s Axel Springer (SPRGn.DE) to the prize, marks the biggest acquisition by a Japanese media organisation and is a coup for the employee-owned firm which lends its name to the main Japanese stock market index.In the Financial Times it has acquired an authoritative global newspaper that commands strong loyalty from its readers and has coped better than others with the shift to online publishing. It was one of the first newspapers to successfully charge for access to its website.Established in 1884 and first printed on pink paper in 1893 to stand out from rivals, the FT has employed some of the leading figures in media and politics, including Robert Thomson, Chief Executive of News Corp (NWSA.O), former British finance minister Nigel Lawson and Ed Balls, an adviser to former British prime minister Gordon Brown.”I am extremely proud of teaming up with the Financial Times, one of the most prestigious news organisations in the world,” said Tsuneo Kita, chairman and group CEO of Nikkei. “We share the same journalistic values.”The Nikkei newspaper, which has a circulation surpassing 3 million for its morning edition alone, enjoys a must-read reputation for financial and business news in Japan but has struggled to break out of its home market.The paper, with its deep ties to corporate Japan, has also faced criticism for running earnings “previews”, which are considered to be leaks, days ahead of corporate results at a time when Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government has been pushing for greater corporate transparency.As the news broke of the Nikkei deal, an FT journalist tweeted a photograph showing staff in their newsroom crowded around a television watching the developments.According to tweets from journalists who were addressed by the paper’s management, FT Editor Lionel Barber told staff the deal “was not and is not a shotgun marriage”, saying there had been hours of conversation.Reporters at the paper told Reuters there was some apprehension, as they knew very little about their new owner, but there was also relief they had not been bought by Bloomberg – another potential buyer – which could have resulted in duplication of staff roles and more potential job cuts.Chief Executive John Fallon told reporters he believed that like Pearson, the new owner had a commitment to the “fairness and accuracy of its reporting, and to the integrity and independence of its journalism”.BOLT FROM THE BLUEReuters was first to report on Thursday that the 171-year-old Pearson had finally decided to sell the business daily as it expanded more into education, sparking speculation as to who was the buyer.The name of Nikkei came out of the blue. The FT itself reported that Axel Springer, publisher of Germany’s Bild and Die Welt newspapers, was the most likely buyer.”We were all frantically Googling Axel Springer to find out who they were… and everybody was showing off their great German skills. That obviously changed quite quickly,” said one person familiar with the FT newsroom.Analysts and bankers had for years been waiting for Pearson to sell the trophy asset, although the names most closely linked with a deal were financial data terminal providers Bloomberg and Thomson Reuters (TRI.N), parent of Reuters news agency.A person familiar with the situation had told Reuters in recent weeks that Axel Springer was working on a buyout, and a spokeswoman confirmed that the group had held talks about a deal.The sale of the FT Group is expected to close during the fourth quarter of 2015 and does not include its 50 percent stake in The Economist magazine or the London headquarters of the newspaper on the banks of the River Thames.”It is hard to argue with the price,” said Richard Marwood, senior fund manager at AXA Investment Managers, a shareholder in Pearson.Barclays said the price represented a multiple of 35 times earnings before interest, tax and appreciation.Pearson, founded in 1844 as a small building firm in Yorkshire, northern England, was once one of the world’s largest building contractors and has had a long list of varied interests from banking and publishing to owning theme parks and Madame Tussaud’s waxworks.The sale will leave Pearson as the world leader in education publishing and the owner of a 47 percent stake in the Penguin Random House book publisher.last_img read more