QPR linked with Turkey star İnan

first_imgQPR are interested in Galatasaray midfielder Selçuk İnan, according to Turkish media reports.Everton and Leicester City have also been linked with the 29-year-old Turkey international, who signed a long-term contract at his current club during the summer.Rangers, it is claimed, would like to sign him on a six-month deal when the transfer window reopens in January.Meanwhile, the Express claim Arsenal are hoping to push through a  cut-price move for Stephan Lichsteiner in an attempt to beat Chelsea to the signing of the Juventus defender.The Blues are said to be keen on Switzerland international Lichsteiner, 30, as are Real Madrid.His contract expires in the summer and there has been speculation that he could move during the January transfer window.For more transfer speculation, including QPR being linked with a loan move for former Fulham star Clint Dempsey, see Monday morning’s Paper Talk.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Rails Rumble: Micro-App Competition Winners Announced

first_imgSo, that’s what the expert panel of judges and hordes of Rail-loving masses deigned the cream of the crop this year. What’s your take; do any of these apps inspire or excite you? Second Place: How’s My Code?How’s My Code is a peer review tool for developers to comment on, approve of, and flag commits. Email notifications allow users to come back to ongoing discussions. If you spend more time on GitHub than Facebook, this might be an app for you to check out.Here’s a screencast explaining the app:Third Place: TablesurfingUsing Facebook Connect, the Tablesurfing team created an app for those who are into impromptu dinner parties. “Like couchsurfing, but for tables,” Tablesurfing connects users who like to cook with users who are comfortable dining in the homes of strangers (i.e., the adventurous and hungry.) Of course, the concept is replete with issues (necessary critical mass of user adoption, sketch factor of inviting those weird “Internet people” into your home), but it’s a sweet idea with a nice UI.Check out the demo video here:Appearance Category Winner: LowdownLowdown (currently offline for post-Rumble revamping) is/was a drop-dead gorgeous task/project management tool for working with Cucumber. As the development team wrote, ‘If Cucumber lets us ‘describe how software should behave in plain text… in a business-readable domain-specific language’ then Lowdown is the tea party where thinly sliced sandwiches are served on nice platters instead of trying to swallow it whole.’ Full-featured and flexible, it was one of several related apps in the Rumble yet stood out for its pristine user interface that was a breeze to understand and use and a pleasure to look at. We look forward to playing around with the app more once it relaunches.Take a look at this demo in the meantime:Usefulness Category Winner: ZenVDN“Talk about ambitious – building a video delivery network for the Rumble is crazy!” So wrote expert and Viget Labs technology director Ben Scofield of ZenVDN. Perhaps the nature and scope of the project isn’t such a surprise when one considers that the team behind this project also constructed web video apps ZenCoder and Flix Cloud. Ambitious or not, the site is good-looking and designed for simplicity. ZenVDN encodes videos for the web and mobile devices, allows for HD resolution and embedding, and makes use of a global content delivery network. Truth be told, as it must be on a tech news blog, we were unsuccessful in our attempts to upload a video to our profile, and ironically, the app’s demo video was not embeddable.UPDATE: ZenVDN just emailed us this embeddable version of their demo:There’s something to be said for constructing a full-fledged application in 48 hours. There’s something else to be said for naming said application in such a way that conjures only the fondest memories of Dana Carvey in a platinum wig. Simply put, “Hurl makes HTTP requests. Enter a URL, set some headers, then view the response. Perfect for APIs.” Hurl comes from Pownce founder/Six Apart engineer Leah Culver and Chris Wanstrath and will officially launch soon.Completeness Category Winner: hurlCheck out the screencast for a demo:Innovation Category Winner: LAZEROIDS!!!This team built a neverending, massively mutliplayer, peer-to-peer version of Asteroids with sound design that had commenters raving (pew! pew!). LAZEROIDS!!! (sic) was moreover developed with complete disregard for IE support. Still, experts and commenters alike were impressed with the execution and simplicity of this app. You can check out the team’s blog for information on the architecture, or you can just go play the game. Solo Category Winner: AlertMe.tvOne is the loneliest number, and special consideration was given to the developers who chose to fly solo in this competition. One of our favorite apps – a well-designed, useful tool – was AlertMe.tv, a simple system for users’ opting in to notifications about their favorite TV shows. Email, SMS, or IM notifications are sent when new episodes are about to air. Adding new shows to the site’s database is also particularly simple. As someone who needs to be reminded when Saturday Night Live airs, I particularly appreciate this app. Congratulations to Jacques Crocker, the Rails Jedi of Silicon Valley. Couch potatoes the world around salute you. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Microapp#start jolie odell 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting In 48 hours last weekend, 237 developer teams competed and generated a total of 137 qualifying web applications, all developed with Ruby and Rails on the back end.The 2009 Rails Rumble was, according to organizers, the strongest yet in the contest’s history. (Disclosure: I was on the “expert panel” of judges for the Rumble and got a sneak peak at a significant handful of apps.)As microapps (as this particular brand of simple, single-function sites and widgets could be called) occupy an ever-increasing tract of Internet real estate, time-crunch events such as Startup Weekend and Rails Rumble serve as tests of skill and team-building challenges, not to mention endurance competitions as developers burn through hour after sleepless hour. Yet with each cycle, these events do produce a number of noteworthy apps that might grow into something more in the weeks and months to follow while teaching all developers valuable lessons about simplicity in interface design. Here’s a quick breakdown of the eight winning Rails Rumble applications.First Place: Hi.ImHi I’m is (yet another) service that aggregates a user‘s social streams to a centralized location, sort of like Retaggr, Chi.mp, and their ilk. The idea wasn’t the most innovative, as many of the 80 comments on this project noted, but the user experience was as simple as following the yellow brick road. The app was developed by San Jose-based web/mobile development shop Koombea. Related Posts last_img read more

The Perfect Wall, Roof, and Slab — Building Science Podcast

first_imgRELATED MULTIMEDIA Video: Superinsulating a Home with Rigid FoamA Home Energy AuditGreen Builder Won’t Compromise on the Envelope GREEN PRODUCT GUIDE Insulation Blown Insulation Batt Insulation Board Insulation Foam InsulationThe most important factors are often not considered in design, construction, and regulation; and the unimportant ones tend to have an overly enthusiastic and detailed amount of specs associated with them. The Perfect Wall has all of the structure to the interior and all of the control functions to the exterior. Let’s start at the outside of the perfect wall with the cladding. Cladding provides three functions: 1. Aesthetics, 2. Protection from UV light 3. Physical, mechanical protection of the other control layers. Aesthetics matter because people don’t take care of ugly things. Ugliness is not sustainable. The longer something is around, the more resources it consumes, so the more resource efficient it is, and the fewer resources it uses over its lifetime. We want a beautiful building that lasts a long time and is ultra-efficient. Claddings should be completely open — we want air circulation behind the cladding system. The more air circulation, the better the system works. Sealants are purely aesthetic, they’re not functional. If the sealants fail, the primary air, thermal, vapor and rain control elements are not affected. If we take the perfect wall and lean it, we get the perfect roof. From the inside to the outside, the control layers are:StructureVapor control membraneInsulationCladdingSome of the old-timers will recognize this type of roof as an IRMA — Inverted Roof Membrane system. If you replace the ballast with dirt, grass, and a goat, you would get a green roof. (That was a joke.) Flip the roof and you get the perfect slab:Dirt and stonesInsulationVaporConcrete (structure)The physics of a foundation, wall and roof are the same (this is an Ah-Ha! moment). When we look at a section of the perfect roof, wall, and slab, and we get the other Ah-Ha! moment — the important parts are the corners. You have to connect the rain control element of the foundation to the rain control element of the walls, the air control element of the foundation to the air control element of the walls, the vapor control element of the foundation to the vapor control element of the walls, the thermal control element of the foundation to the thermal control element of the walls… Pretty fundamental stuff. Most failures occur where roofs connect to walls _Tip: Buy multi-colored pens_ Whenever we do design reviews in our office, we tell the youngsters to take a colored pen and trace the rain control layer around the building enclosure. If the pen has to leave the paper, they’ve identified a discontinuity that needs to be addressed. Use a different colored pen for each of the control layers. Whenever the pen leaves the paper, you’ve identified a flaw. It’s as simple as that. We find that the flaws are concentrated at the connecting elements. Windows complicate the perfect wall Now these are pretty easy, but it gets complicated. In the real world, someone pokes a hole in the building and we call that a window. Windows have to do everything that a wall does, and more. It has to control water, air, heat, and vapor; you want to be able to see through it, and every so often someone is going to want to open it too. Windows can actually do all of that stuff, which is pretty amazing. No wonder they’re so expensive. All we have to do is connect the rain control element of the window to the rain control element of the wall, the air control element of the window to the air control element of the wall, the vapor control element of the window to the vapor control element of the wall, the thermal control element of the window to the thermal control element of the wall. The reason we’ve been having so much trouble with window-to-wall connections is because we’ve been relying on one person to do all of this: His name is “By-Others.” Mr. By-Others shows up on all of these specs and you have to make sure he is not going to be responsible for all of these connections. Someone has to be responsible. The window industry doesn’t do us any favors either — they don’t tell us in their window system which part of these windows systems are responsible for controlling water, air, vapor and heat. In the absence of guidance, we have to assume that the innermost component of the window is where all four of those functions collapse. So we wrap the window openings and make the connection at the back — so that if the window should fail, the water will go to the outside. That’s how you design a building: water continuity, air continuity, vapor continuity, thermal continuity. It can’t be that simple, right? Well, the answer is, “Yes it is.” Podcasts: Podcast:Air Barriers vs. Vapor BarriersHow Heat Moves Through HomesEfflorescence = Water Damage Insulation Retrofits on Old Masonry BuildingsHow Air Affects a House RELATED ARTICLES Insulation Overview Insulating Roofs, Walls, and Floors Installing Fiberglass Right” Insulation Choices Can Foam Insulation Be Too Thick? The Global Warming Impact of Insulation CONSTRUCTION DETAILS Building Plans for the Energy Star Thermal Bypass Checklist Energy Star checklist details Insulating behind tub with rigid foam Air sealing behind tub Foundation/Floor Intersections Roof/Wall Intersections Wall/Floor Intersections _This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called_ Building Science Fundamentals _with Drs. Joe Lstiburek and John Straube of Building Science Corporation. For information on attending a live class, go to BuildingScienceseminars.com This week Dr. Joe talks about enclosure design principles of energy efficient buildings_ _______________________________Let’s start with smart things The building enclosure has four functions. In order of importance, they are: 1. Rain control 2. Air control 3. Vapor control 4. Thermal control Thermal control is the easiest to specify, calculate, and measure, so that’s what codes focus on. Codes typically ignore the most important layers because they’re the most difficult to specify. The vapor control layer is easier to specify than the air control layer, so codes obsess over specifying the vapor control layer and ignoring the air control layer. Video:last_img read more

Pune man punished with 50 squats for ‘objectionable’ remark against Raj Thackeray

first_imgA video clip, showing Maharashtra Navnirman Sena (MNS) workers allegedly punishing a man with 50 squats in Pune for allegedly criticising party chief Raj Thackeray on social media, has gone viral.In the clip, the man identifies himself as Rohit Burade, and is surrounded by MNS workers led by the student wing leaders Ashish Sable-Patil and Rahul Gawali. He is made to acknowledge his “error” in posting an “objectionable” comment against Mr. Thackeray on the MNS leader’s Facebook page.The MNS workers are heard saying that Mr. Burade was let off easily as he was a Maharashtrian hailing from a poor family. “His father passed away… Hence, we are not beating him up,” one of them is heard remarking.The party workers are then heard reprimanding Mr. Burade, making him say, ““Raaj saheb, I have made a mistake and this will not happen again,” even as the victim is seen gasping for breath. They then issue a warning that anyone insulting Mr. Thackeray would suffer a similar fate. No case has been lodged against the MNS workers.last_img read more