10 months agoLeicester boss Puel to bench Vardy for Man City Cup clash

first_imgAbout the authorChris BeattieShare the loveHave your say Leicester boss Puel to bench Vardy for Man City Cup clashby Chris Beattie10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City boss Claude Puel is set to omit Jamie Vardy from his line-up for their Carabao Cup quarterfinal tie with Mannchester City.Puel is planning to prioritise Saturday’s Premier League match at Chelsea by making a number of changes to his line-up on Tuesday, including starting Vardy on the bench, even though Leicester are three games from Wembley.Vardy, Leicester’s joint-top scorer with five Premier League goals, has been managing a groin problem but returned to fitness for Saturday’s match at Crystal Palace where he played the full 90 minutes against expectations, says the Daily Mail. Puel has been advised Vardy requires some recuperation and has decided to provide it for the visit of City. last_img read more

23 days agoStoke boss Nathan Jones accepts he’ll likely lose his job

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Stoke boss Nathan Jones accepts he’ll likely lose his jobby Paul Vegas23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveStoke City boss Nathan Jones has accepted he will likely lose his job this week.Jones was speaking after the Potters lost 1-0 at home to fellow strugglers Huddersfield Town.He admitted: “If I’m not getting the results I expect the inevitable to happen. I’m not concerned. I was concerned after four days of taking the job, but I’m not concerned now.”The league table doesn’t lie after 10 games, we just haven’t been good enough. It’s a wonderful club and the fans and owners have given me lots of patience, but we’ve lost our way and something has to change.”I’ve had nine months to turn things around and, for one reason or another, I’ve not done it. It’s been tough on me and my family, but I just feel sad. It’s a great club but it just hasn’t worked out.”I couldn’t have given it any more, I’ve given it everything I can.” last_img read more

Quick Facts ChurchillKeewatinook Aski

first_imgAPTN National NewsDuring the election, APTN will be profiling 51 ridings the Assembly of First Nations say Aboriginal voters can make a difference.Riding: Churchill-Keewatinook AskiCandidates:  Quick Facts:The Incumbent is the NDP’s Niki Ashton who won the riding by 5,422 in the last general election.In the last Parliament, Ashton served as the Aboriginal Affairs critic and was also a regular panelist on APTN’s political show, Nation to Nation. Ashton won the riding by more than 5,000 votes in the last election.As of Sept. 28, no Conservative candidate had been identified. Click on Conservative for any updates.Liberal candidate Rebecca Chartrand is from the Pine Creek First Nation but has lived most of her life in Winnipeg. Chartrand is an educator in the city and has been advocating for more Aboriginal culture and teaching aids into the curriculum in inner-city schools.The Green’s August Hastmann is also an educator. Hastmann has worked across Manitoba’s north.Churchill-Keewatin Aski makes up almost half of Manitoba.Nunavut is the riding’s northern border.last_img read more

New publication offers evidencebased content for global breast imaging medical community

first_img Source: https://global.oup.com/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 11 2018JBI is a peer-reviewed publication that aims to provide high quality, evidence-based content for the global breast imaging medical community. The journal seeks to advance the field of breast imaging, with particular focus on improving patient care and outcomes. JBI will publish original research, as well as reviews of important scientific, educational, and clinical topics.”It’s an honor to oversee the launch of JBI,” says Jennifer A. Harvey, MD, FACR, FSBI, JBI’s Editor-in-Chief. “The journal will provide a focused platform to disseminate scholarly work, as well as practical articles on breast cancer screening, clinical practice aspects of breast imaging, and educational opportunities, with the goal of advancing the global field of breast imaging for the betterment of patient care.”Related StoriesSuper-Resolution Raman Imaging with Plasmonic SubstratesInnovative magnetic nanoparticles show potential for PET/MRI bimodal imaging applicationsAn injection of nanoparticles for spinal cord injuriesSBI’s mission since its inception in 1985 has been to save lives and minimize the impact of breast cancer. JBI is uniquely positioned to advance this mission, according to Jay A. Baker, MD, FACR, FSBI, the Society’s President: “Despite the importance of breast imaging in the lives of countless women – and more than a few men – physicians and scientists seeking new information about the science and clinical practice of breast imaging have had to rely on the relatively few studies found in general interest journals. As the official journal of the Society of Breast Imaging, JBI solves this problem by providing a home for the latest research and clinical guidance for those who practice and those who study all facets of breast imaging.”Alison Denby, publishing director for Oxford Journals, said, “We’re looking forward to working with SBI to launch this much needed outlet for research in breast imaging. SBI is an engaged, dedicated group and we are committed to working together for this journal’s success.”last_img read more

Lowlevel cannabis use can change the adolescent brain

first_imgAnalyzing data from a large research program investigating adolescent brain development and mental health, Catherine Orr and colleagues identified brain regions rich in cannabinoid receptors that underwent structural changes in teenagers who reported limited cannabis use. These differences persisted despite controlling for many variables, including sex and socioeconomic status as well as alcohol and nicotine use, and were only apparent after cannabis use. Finally, the researchers demonstrate associations between increased grey matter volume in low-level cannabis users and assessments of reasoning and anxiety.Given the important role of the endogenous cannabinoid system in brain development during adolescence, teenagers may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of THC, the primary psychoactive component of marijuana. Additional research is needed to determine whether these findings apply to more diverse populations beyond the four European countries studied here.Source: http://www.sfn.org/ Jan 16 2019Teenagers who report using recreational marijuana just once or twice display increased volume of numerous brain regions, according to a study of 14-year-olds from Ireland, England, France, and Germany. The research, published in JNeurosci, warrants further study of low-level cannabis use among adolescents amid changing societal attitudes toward the drug.last_img read more

Study shows benefits of including red raspberries in the diet of people

first_img Source:https://web.iit.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 26 2019A study released today from the Illinois Institute of Technology shows the benefits of including red raspberries in the diet of individuals with pre-diabetes and insulin resistance.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 34 percent of American adults, around 84.1 million in all, had prediabetes in 2015. Patients with prediabetes are at higher risk for a number of conditions – including developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease.The study, published in Obesity, investigated the effects of red raspberries in a group of people at-risk for diabetes who were overweight or obese and presented with prediabetes and insulin resistance. A metabolically healthy control group was also included in the study for reference.Related StoriesIntermittent fasting may protect against type 2 diabetesDiabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have beneficial long-term clinical outcomesNew biomaterial could encapsulate and protect implanted insulin-producing cellsUsing a randomized, controlled, acute study design, 32 adults between the ages of 20-60 years had their blood tested over a 24-hour period after eating breakfast on three separate days. The three breakfast meals were similar in calories and macronutrients, but differed in the amount of frozen red raspberries – one meal contained no raspberries, one contained one cup of raspberries and one contained two cups of raspberries.The results showed that as the amount of raspberry intake increased, individuals at risk for diabetes needed less insulin to manage their blood glucose. When two cups of red raspberries were included in the meal, glucose concentrations were lower compared to the meal with no red raspberries. The data suggests that simple inclusion of certain fruits, such as red raspberries with meals, can have glucose lowering benefits with indications of improvements in insulin responses. These effects are particularly important for people who are overweight or obese with pre-diabetes.”People at risk for diabetes are often told to not eat fruit because of their sugar content. However, certain fruits – such as red raspberries – not only provide essential micronutrients, but also components such as anthocyanins, which give them their red color, ellagitannins and fibers that have anti-diabetic actions,” said Britt Burton-Freeman, Ph.D., director, Center for Nutrition Research at Illinois Tech. “For people who are at risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other health risks, knowing what foods have protective benefits and working them into your diet now can be an important strategy for slowing or reversing progression to disease.”last_img read more

Researchers unravel the biology of how obesity promotes triplenegative breast cancer

first_img Source:https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 7 2019Smoking has long been the biggest cause of cancer in the United States, but obesity, now the second leading cause, has been gaining ground. A new study from researchers at the University of Chicago finds that women with breast cancer, the most common cancer among women, are at even higher risk from obesity.Breast cancers occur in adipose tissue, better known as fat. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a type of breast cancer that is particularly difficult to treat. None of the three most appealing drug targets — the estrogen receptor, the progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 — are present on TNBC cells.”These cancers can be particularly aggressive,” said study author Lev Becker, PhD, an assistant professor in the Ben May Department for Cancer Research at the University of Chicago. “For patients with TNBC, there are few therapeutic options. The survival rate is quite low. And the cancer tends to be dramatically elevated in patients who are overweight or obese.”Obesity has become “a global epidemic,” Becker said. The prevalence in the United States is about 36 percent for ages 20 to 39, 43 percent for ages 40 to 59, and 41 percent for those 60 and older. The United States is ranked 12th worldwide for obesity.”Current treatment of breast cancer patients ignores the ongoing obesity epidemic,” said study co-author Marsha Rosner, PhD, the Charles B. Huggins Professor in the Ben May Department for Cancer Research. “In order to take this into consideration, we need to help patients lose weight or identify new drug targets that would be effective in obese cancer patients.”Unfortunately, once the cancer has been detected there may not be time to lose weight prior to treatment. “So our bottom line,” Rosner said, is to “promote weight loss as a cancer prevention measure, incorporate weight loss as a component of therapy for patients with breast cancer, and develop specific drug targets that could be leveraged to address the obesity component of the disease.”Related StoriesStudy reports role of cancer gene in tumor microenvironmentHarnessing target of the brain chemical serotonin to combat obesityBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryIn their paper, “Metabolically activated adipose tissue macrophages link obesity to triple-negative breast cancer,” published May 3, 2019 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, Becker, Rosner and colleagues unravel the biology of how obesity promotes TNBC. They show that obesity reprograms macrophages — scavenger white blood cells that can devour invaders such as bacteria, viruses or tumor cells — into pro-inflammatory, metabolically-activated macrophages. Instead of fighting breast cancer, these immune cells actually promote it.”Our studies, in mice and humans,” Becker added, “implicate these metabolically-activated adipose tissue macrophages.” They accumulate in mammary adipose tissue. They release interleukin 6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine which can fuel tumorigenesis. And they thrive on obesity.Interleukin 6 binds to a receptor on the surface of existing cancer cells. That can create “an even more aggressive stem cell phenotype,” Becker said. “These cancer stem cells are able to encourage tumor growth and metastasis, enabling them to travel to other sites.” Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have higher levels of IL-6 in their blood, which is correlated with poor survival rates.Obesity, the study authors wrote, is a pathological state that “facilitates tumorigenesis by creating tumor permissive conditions in multiple tissues.” This suggests that chronic inflammation and its effects on tumorigenesis may be reversed by targeted anti-inflammatory therapies or by weight loss. Indeed, the researchers found that inducing weight loss in obese mice by feeding them a healthier low-fat diet reversed macrophage inflammation and TNBC tumor formation in mammary fat, even though their body weight remained elevated. These findings highlight the potential value of weight loss, not only as a preventive intervention but even after patients develop breast cancer.last_img read more

Turning injectable medicines into inhalable treatments with the help of smart phone

Friend and colleagues are using devices found in cell phones to atomize very thick liquids. Credit: University of California – San Diego Provided by University of California – San Diego This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Researchers use acoustic waves to move fluids at the nanoscale Imagine if all childhood vaccines could get delivered with an inhaler rather than shots; or wiping away tuberculosis bacteria in a patient’s lungs with an inhaler; or disinfecting a hospital room thoroughly with a diffuser. Explore further Citation: Turning injectable medicines into inhalable treatments with the help of smart phone components (2018, April 11) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-medicines-inhalable-treatments-smart-components.html These are the goals of a research team led by Professor James Friend in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of California San Diego. Their efforts were recently boosted when Friend received a prestigious $900,000 research grant from the Keck Foundation, whose mission is to support pioneering discoveries in science, engineering and medical research.”Our goal is to make injectable treatments inhalable,” Friend said. “This would unlock a whole class of new treatments.”For example, in a clinical setting, powerful disinfectants could be delivered via diffusers in hospital rooms to eliminate harmful bacteria. A whole new class of medicines could be delivered to patients via inhalers. Finally, a whole range of new materials could be used for 3-D printing.Currently, fluids can be nebulized in many different ways, for example by mechanical means like in perfume and cologne sprayers, or by using ultrasound. But all of these methods either don’t work well with very viscous fluids like oil or honey, or they require too much power, or break down some of the fluids’ active ingredients. They also require expensive equipment.The method developed by Friend and colleagues uses devices found in smart phones that produce acoustic waves. In the phones, these devices are used mainly to filter the wireless cellular signal and identify and filter voice and data information.In the lab, Friend and his team used the devices to generate sound waves at extremely high frequencies—ranging from 100 million to 10 billion Hertz—in order to create fluid capillary waves, which in turn emit droplets, generating mist. This process is called atomization. The researchers’ breakthroughs are based on the ability to atomize liquids that have been considered too viscous for the process before.The new method holds the promise of dramatically lowering costs for developing inhaled drugs by using smart phone components that are inexpensive. Currently, the cost for developing inhaled medicines is $300 million over a period of three years.Researchers successfully tested the atomization method on a powerful disinfectant, Triethylene glycol, or TEG, which had never been atomized before on its own (it is usually dissolved in water).No one before had observed how fluids behaved when subjected to such high sound frequencies. Scientists led by Friend discovered that the equations used to predict wave generation in fluids did not work for their experiments—in fact, they are off by several orders of magnitude. Some of that math dates back more than 150 years, to experiments by British physicist and chemist Michael Faraday.The Keck grant will allow researchers to acquire the cutting-edge technologies as well as the workforce they need to figure out the right math to describe and predict atomization at such high frequencies. This in turn will allow researchers to apply their new method to a broader range of materials, unlocking new applications. read more