Country music star Troy Cassar-Daley is ready to let go

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:29Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p360p360p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenTroy Cassar-Daley sells his farm!00:29Country music star Troy Cassar-Daley is bracing for his heart to break a little, with the home he wrote a song about set to sell under the hammer today. One of his favourite things to do is get the kayak out and go fishing on the river.Troy’s song “I love this place” was written about this property.The home in Vernor, just under an hour west of the Brisbane CBD, goes under the hammer at 2.30pm at Ray White Ipswich, 81 Limestone St, Ipswich, according to agent Jackson Wales. The lifestyle property spans 4.1 hectares with the home having four bedrooms, two bathrooms and parking for six vehicles.“It’s been a big part of our children’s lives and a nice escape from the city,” Mr Cassar-Daley said.“It’s an hour door to door from our place and we’re around Bulimba. Being an hour door to door has been a saving grace because we’ve been able to just get in the car, not pack too much stuff, you might be in traffic for a bit but by the time you got out there it’s just incredible. You get to smell the country air. I was out there the other day and thought I’m going to miss this place.”The family plans to spend more time on the Sunshine Coast in future.“When it comes down to the kids we’re going to spend a bit more time on the Sunny Coast, a bit more salt water fishing not river fishing.He loves fishing at the property.Troy and Laurel brought their kids up on the farm — choosing the simple life over school sports’ runs.MORE REAL ESTATE STORIESMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoRichlister takes huge early offer on homeDam, what a catchAuction yields $6m-plus in sales“On the farm, the bass fishing is right on the doorstep of the property. It’s incredible to get in the kayak and cast off. You walk down to the water and put it in. There are resident platypus.It’s a beautiful part of the river to fish. I’d get down there even before breakfast is cooked, take one of the kids, there’s mist on the water, that’s something really special. By the weekend I’m hankering to get out there.”He said the property would make “an amazing BNB”.“It crossed our minds a couple of times but I’m not a good manager. I’d be up there on the veranda with the guitar, probably saying things I shouldn’t. We’ve had some incredible musical jams on the veranda there.”Many songs have been written on this property. Troy Cassar Daley on his farm less than an hour west of Brisbane CBD.Currently on tour across the country, he told The Courier-Mail of the nostalgia creeping in now that he was now done caring for horses, kayaking in the river, and watching sunsets from his veranda.“It’s that time of our lives where we have two adult kids and we have to move on to the next part of our lives that doesn’t involve riding and caring for horses or slashing paddocks,” he said.MORE REAL ESTATE NEWS He loves pottering on the farm.He and wife Laurel Edwards, a breakfast show radio announcer with 4KQ, have two children – a daughter who is 18 and son who’s turning 21.“They’re young adults and living their own lives and my friend put it best when he said you’re coming into a new season,” Mr Cassar-Daley said. “You have to work out what you want to do now for next ten years after the kids move on. Find things that interest you in common.”“I’ve written many songs while I was there over the years. ‘I love this place’ was written was out there on the kitchen table, I used to invite friends out there. Those tables have been absolutely covered with instruments. Probably the last three records were written out there.”“I’d just mowed the lawn and was up there with my little acoustic and started to think about what the place actually meant, and it’s a pretty important place for me and will always be.”Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58“The place has personality I will miss the farm’s personality, it’s like an old friend and you do these catchups, I will miss the friendship, the water, watching the sun down.”“We call it the farm, we had our horses there, we buried two of our horses there, it’s been a real part of our fabric, it’s great to get the kids off the gadgets and onto a kayak or horse or trampoline. Fresh air. The kids I hope have formed some great memories out there as well.”“It’s a special place. I’m very happy. It’s the next season.”* Troy Cassar-Daley’s home will go under the hammer at 2.30pm today at Ray White Ipswich, 81 Limestone St, Ipswich QLD 4305, Phone number (07) 3281 9655.FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK ‘I had a few beers, got creative’Property ticks boxes for richest female CEOQueenslander and art collection up for grabsWhat would you trade for a luxury apartment and yacht?last_img read more

Left to lead: As the veteran of SU’s defense, Megill looks to carry on a proud tradition

first_imgThe impact of the hit echoed throughout the Carrier Dome. Seven minutes into the first game of his Syracuse career, Brian Megill proved he belonged out on the field as a starter. The freshman defender drilled Denver’s Alex Drexler along the left sideline, leaving him down on the ground in pain and knocking him out of the game. The crushing hit sent a woozy Drexler wobbling to the sideline with a concussion and officially established Megill as a rising star in college lacrosse. ‘Everybody kind of knew after that hit, this guy’s the real deal and people who didn’t know about him were about to find out because he was able to blow this kid up,’ former SU goaltender John Galloway said. ‘And I’ll never forget it. It was against Denver, and we all kind of looked at each other and felt much more at ease. ‘We knew that this kid wasn’t worried, he wasn’t scared to play and he was going to be special on Syracuse.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Through two years, Megill has lived up to that billing. He went on to start every game during his first year, becoming the first freshman defender to do so under head coach John Desko. And Megill brought that physical presence to a stifling defensive unit that ranked among the best in the country. But now, the junior is expected to do more following the graduation of All-Americans Galloway, John Lade, Joel White and Tom Guadagnolo. As the lone returning starter on defense, it is on Megill’s shoulders to lead the unit and carry on the proud tradition. ‘The last time that I talked to him, I told him that it was his defense now,’ Lade said. ‘He’s got to definitely work harder than any other defenseman in the country, and he’s definitely got to be ready to play some great attackmen.’ His teammates and coaches rave about his work ethic. His intensity and physicality caught their attention immediately during the fall of his freshman year. And Guadagnolo and his former teammates all say the 6-foot, 226-pound Megill is the total package as a defender — strong enough to stop a bull dodger like Denver’s 6-foot-4, 210-pound attack Mark Matthews, but also quick enough to stick with Duke’s Jordan Wolf, a speedy 5-foot-9, 170-pound attack. While Lade and Galloway couldn’t pick out a flaw in the preseason All-American’s game, Megill knows of one glaring weakness that has been there since high school. He’s gotten quicker over the years, but he’s still not quick enough. White could see the frustration on Megill’s face as he chased Cornell attack Rob Pannell around the Carrier Dome field to no avail. With top cover man Lade out with an injury, Pannell torched Syracuse for six points, scoring two of his three goals against Megill in the second quarter as SU fell for the first and only time of the regular season in 2011. ‘I learned a lot,’ Megill said. ‘I learned I was still really slow because Rob Pannell is fast. He’s a great attackman, best I’ve seen in a long, long time.’ With that game in the back of his mind, Megill entered the offseason determined to get faster. His brother, Ray, a former All-American defender at Maryland, had been telling him his footwork needed improvement since high school. But Megill could get by using his superior strength to overpower opponents then and didn’t take his brother’s advice. This past offseason, the agility drills he once ignored became a part of his routine. He kept a speed ladder, cones, parachute and weighted vest in the back of his truck. ‘There’s times where he would just at the most random point in the day, he would just hop up and say, ‘I’m going to go for a run or I’m going to go workout,” Ray Megill said. ‘So he definitely does have a tireless work ethic.’ Megill tested himself even more when he spent part of the summer living with his brother in Rockville, Md. Ray Megill put him through CrossFit workouts, an unconventional fitness program designed to increase endurance and push athletes to their limits. The workouts can be as short as five minutes or as long as an hour. From up-downs and tire flips to box jumps and medicine ball training, the intense sessions were grueling. But Megill was hungry to get better, motivated by his struggles against Pannell last April. ‘I use that game as my drive to workout and to get better because I feel like I can play so much better and do better,’ Megill said. ‘And he’s one of the guys that I think about when I’m working out, that pushes me even harder, that gets me going that when I’m sitting down watching TV, I’m like, ‘I wonder what he’s doing.” That work ethic has defined Megill’s entire Syracuse career. Megill wasn’t highly touted coming out of Arthur L. Johnson High School in Clark, N.J., but he separated himself from the rest of his class and forced his way into the discussion for the open starting spot on defense during fall practice. The young defender was a pest, slashing and laying hits on big-time attack Cody Jamieson and Chris Daniello, who had helped the Orange to two straight national titles before he arrived. White remembers Megill injecting life into a dead practice with a big hit or a fast-break goal, telling his teammates through his actions to pick up the intensity. ‘He wasn’t afraid to come across the middle and stir up things even in practice,’ White said. ‘I can definitely remember a couple of times him coming across the middle and laying someone out and really spicing up practice a little bit.’ Through his hustle at practice, Megill earned the respect of his teammates in the locker room. Guadagnolo said the young defender pushed them to get better. He yelled at juniors and seniors if he felt they could go harder — something rarely seen in an underclassman. And Megill also made an impression through his actions in the weight room. Megill was often seen in a full sweat suit on a treadmill overlooking the football weight room as he tried to shed pounds and improve his conditioning. Multiple times, Guadagnolo recalled seeing Megill running after practice when everyone else had already left for the night. ‘Even if he didn’t say something, just other guys seeing him doing it, it would change their perspective on things, and they would start doing it,’ Guadagnolo said. ‘‘Oh man, this guy’s only a sophomore, and he’s working harder than you or he’s working harder than me.’ Guys would be embarrassed, so now we need to start doing it, too.’ His relentless drive struck Galloway during the fall of Megill’s freshman year. In the corner of Wohl Field before a practice, Megill approached the junior goaltender, who could tell the rookie had a lot on his mind. The defender was agonizing over the decision to redshirt or play as a freshman, and he sought advice from Galloway. The quick conversation ended with Galloway giving him a vote of confidence, telling Megill he could earn the starting spot after seeing his aggressive style of play and eagerness to learn. In that moment, Galloway said he first realized Megill would be special. About five months later, his eye-opening hit against Denver proved it. And two years later, the lacrosse world knows his name as one of the top players in the game, just as Galloway predicted. ‘I told people his freshman year, ‘He’s going to go down as one of the best defenders that Syracuse University’s ever had,” Galloway said. ‘His physicality, his stick skills, he just has that special something that you’re looking for in a teammate.’ rjgery@syr.edu Comments Published on February 15, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Ryne: rjgery@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Grenada warns against importing Africanized bees from Trinidad and Tobago

first_imgAfricanized honeybee (left), and European honeybee (right.) Grenada agricultural and custom officials have stepped up their surveillance amid reports that people were seeking to illegally import Africanize bees from Trinidad and Tobago.No bees should be imported“We want the general public to know especially those who are not registered with the Ministry of Agriculture as a beekeeper that bees should never be imported into the country, no matter which part of the world they come, no bee should be imported,” said Quasi Williams of the Veterinary and Livestock Division of the Ministry of Agriculture.He said the Division had received reliable information that an apiary operator was seeking to import the bees illegally from Trinidad.A statement issued by the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands warned the general public that it is illegal to import bees from other regional islands as well as internationally.Stop immediately  “Persons seeking to bring in Africanized bees from Trinidad are asked to stop immediately as these bees would destroy our native bees and very harmful to the Grenadian population,” the statement said.Williams said that Africanized bees also known as killer bees “are very dangerous and shouldn’t be allowed into our island and the Ministry would treat this matter very seriously.”He urged persons with any information regarding the importation of Africanized bees from Trinidad to report the matter to the relevant authorities.Earlier this month, Barbados said it would become the second country in the Caribbean to establish an apiary lab geared at detecting diseases among the island’s bee population and to determine the extent of the Africanization of the bees.last_img read more