Shawn Mendes To Kick Off MTV Unplugged Reboot

first_img Shawn Mendes To Kick Off “MTV Unplugged” Reboot Email “MTV Unplugged” Returns With Shawn Mendes shawn-mendes-kick-mtv-unplugged-reboot Facebook The iconic MTV series gets a fresh coat of paint, with new episodes featuring today’s stars in interesting venuesNate HertweckGRAMMYs Aug 17, 2017 – 2:03 pm GRAMMY.comMTV has announced a reboot of their beloved “Unplugged” franchise for this fall. The network is not holding back on star power either, enlisting pop chart-topper Shawn Mendes for the first installment of the relaunched series.The show, originally conceived and launched in 1989 by singer/songwriter Jules Shear (who hosted the first 13 episodes) along with producers Robert Small and Jim Burns, drew on a late ’80s fad of rock bands performing acoustic versions of their hits at award shows and televised events.It soon became a staple of ’90s pop culture, hosting memorable stripped-down televised performances by the likes of Nirvana, A Tribe Called Quest, Mariah Carey, Eric Clapton, and many more.Clapton’s Unplugged album went on to win the GRAMMY for Album Of The Year, with “Tears In Heaven” also taking Song Of The Year and Record Of The Year, at the 35th GRAMMY Awards. Tony Bennett became the second artist to win Album Of The Year for an “Unplugged” album at the 37th GRAMMY Awards.According to Variety, the new series is looking to “mix things up this time around.””‘Let’s take it to cool locations’ was the thought,” said MTV’s Amani Duncan, who is heading the new launch. “Like where the artist played their first major show, or maybe they choose a location to make a pro-social statement, or it’s, ‘I always wanted to play Carnegie Hall.'”The reboot of “MTV Unplugged” featuring Shawn Mendes from the Theatre at Ace Hotel in Los Angeles is scheduled to air Sept. 8.How Much Do You Know About Nirvana’s MTV Unplugged album? News Twitter last_img read more

The PhoneSoap 3 UV germ killer is on sale for 64

first_img Mentioned Above D-Link Wi-Fi Smart Plug D-Link Wi-Fi Smart Plug Preview • Belkin’s WeMo switches have a new rival See it Comments Share your voice See It CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $49 14 The Cheapskate Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Review • D-Link’s Wi-Fi Smart Plug needs to wise up $22 Amazon Walmart Tags Mobile Accessories Smart Home PhoneSoap I have mixed feelings about today’s deal, but it’s one of those things that’s in the “you decide” category. Because while I’m not convinced phone germs are a real problem, I strongly believe in “better safe than sorry.” So let me start with the deal, then explain my thinking.For a limited time, and while supplies last, Amazon has the PhoneSoap 3 UV Cell Phone Sanitizer for $63.90 when you clip the on-page 20%-off coupon. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page.See it at AmazonThe coupon should apply to nearly all the available colors, but here’s something I just noticed: If you choose Gold or Sand, you’ll see a price of just $48.99! Now, that’s from third-party seller On the Go Shops, and both colors show “in stock on Aug. 25.” That’s a pretty big price difference, and in the past I’ve seen a few folks get burned by third-party Amazon sellers with too-good-to-be-true pricing. That said, you’re protected by Amazon, so why not go for the better deal? Update: Those colors are no longer available.Another quick note: PhoneSoap proper is offering 30% off select bundles with promo code B2S30.See it at PhoneSoapIn case you never saw the PhoneSoap Shark Tank episode or just haven’t heard of the product, it’s a little UV oven that promises to kill 99.99% of the bacteria on your phone (and similarly small objects: earbuds, keys and so on). It’s clinically proven to work as advertised, and takes all of 10 minutes to do its thing.OK, but, do you need it? That’s where I struggle. You’ve probably heard the reports about phone screens being veritable bacteria magnets, with way more germs on average than even a public toilet. But for years I’ve heard the same thing about my computer keyboard. With all this bacteria out there that we’re constantly touching, why aren’t we all sick all the time?The counter-argument, of course, is that maybe we’d be less sick overall if we wiped our keyboards and UV-zapped our phones. Like I said: Better safe than sorry? For students in particular, who live in the petri-dish worlds of classrooms and dorm rooms, and who grope their phones pretty much 24/7, a PhoneSoap might be a wise investment.For what it’s worth, the gizmo has a 4.4-star average rating from nearly 1,000 buyers.Your thoughts on this? (I know you have some.) Bonus deal: Get a 4-pack of Wi-Fi smart plugs for $24gosund-smart-plug-4-packFour for $24. Gosund Every time I write about a smart-plug deal, it sells out quickly — which makes me realize how much everyone is into smart-plug deals. So, here you go: For a limited time, and while supplies last, the Gosund WP5 Wi-Fi smart plug four-pack is just $23.99 when you clip the on-page 5%-off coupon and apply promo code GOSUNDWP5 at checkout.See it at AmazonThat’s only $6 off the regular price, but it still works out to a pretty compelling $6 per plug. Typically you’ll see one for around $10 and two for $18.Though it’s hard to tell for sure, the WP5 looks compact enough that you can plug it into an outlet without blocking the other outlet. It’s compatible with Alexa, Google Assistant and IFTTT — no hub required — though it does require a 2.4GHz Wi-Fi network. If yours can operate only at 5GHz, look elsewhere.The plugs have a 4.2-star average rating from nearly 800 buyers, and Gosund backs them with an impressive two-year warranty.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page, and find more great buys on the CNET Deals page.last_img read more

Can expert reasoning be taught

first_img“Students who are used to working on well-structured problems struggle when confronted with the multiple challenges of more complex tasks.” writes Professor Ogilvie (Iowa State University), who not only assigns context-rich problems in his course but has also begun researching their effect on the problem-solving strategies adopted by students. The problems are implemented in a computer-assisted learning environment of his own design. When a student group logs into the system, a context-rich problem is presented with a selection of information resources that may or may not be relevant. The students are asked to write not just the solution, but describe their thought process in categories corresponding to the typical stages of expert reasoning: qualitative analysis, identification of relevant concepts, ongoing monitoring (evaluation of the solution as it progresses), and validation of the solution obtained. The beauty of this system is that it not only guides the student into a more ‘expert’ mode, it also tracks the time spent at each step, the resources accessed, and so on.So, has this learning environment helped train a new generation of experts?The answer is yes, with some caveats. First, as with any group project it is hard to track which students are working and which ones are learning. Second, Ogilvie’s course presents only five such problems to the students. (There is still all the core material to get through, after all!)As for the results, there is some good news and some bad news.In the first problem of the course, students completed the ‘qualitative analysis’ section an average of ten minutes before completing the assignment. In the last problem, this section was completed about twenty minutes beforehand. Another encouraging point is that very few students wasted time reading all the available information in later problems. “Taken together, the student groups show some progression towards expert-like behavior” Ogilvie writes, “earlier qualitative analysis and more selective requests for information.” By the end of the course, students were also identifying the most relevant concepts earlier.In other words, the students grew more likely to think about the problem before attacking it. That’s the good news!The bad news is that there is no evidence for improvement in one of the most important aspects of expert reasoning: ongoing monitoring. Monitoring is a form of critical thinking, the general (and highly useful) cognitive skill of evaluating the quality of information. Experts in a field will examine their solutions repeatedly as they work them out. Have any of their initial assumptions been violated along the way? Is the solution making progress, or is it getting sidetracked? Is the math becoming simpler or more complicated? If an expert senses that a solution isn’t working well, they may abandon it to look for a better approach.In all fairness, this is also probably the most difficult skill to measure. Computer tracking can only show that students usually filled in the “monitoring” summary right before completing the assignment. No doubt this skill can be taught as well, but it might lie beyond the scope of computer instruction. I still vividly remember one of my professors taking only ten minutes to solve a physics problem that had taken me hours to work out. Perhaps the lesson of monitoring solutions can only be learned by sincerely regretting the time you just wasted.Note: 1groups.physics.umn.edu/physed/ … rch/CRP/crintro.htmlCitation: “Understanding Student Pathways in Context-rich Problems” by Pavlo Antonenko, John Jackman, Piyamart Kumsaikaew, Rahul Marathe, Dale Niederhauser, Craig Ogilvie, and Sarah Ryan is available online at xxx.arxiv.org/abs/physics/0701284By Ben Mathiesen, Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Can expert reasoning be taught? (2007, February 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-02-expert-taught.html In addition to mastering a large body of knowledge, successful researchers must acquire a host of high-level cognitive skills: critical thinking, “framing” a problem, ongoing evaluation of the solution as it progresses, and ruthless validation of one’s final answer. Some students pick these skills up on their own as they advance towards their degree, especially those who participate in research, but they rarely appear in a curriculum. Students working on a context-rich problem fall naturally into two groups. Teams above the line demonstrate expert-like behavior, in that they completed their qualitative analysis of the problem before accessing the relevant information and submitting a solution. Those teams below the line demonstrate novice-like behavior, in that they appear to read through as many resources as they can before attempting a solution and submit their analysis of the problem only after a solution has been recognized. Credit: Craig Ogilvie Expert mathematicians stumped by simple subtractionscenter_img Explore further Professor Craig Ogilvie of Iowa State University has developed a problem-solving environment that not only encourages students to practice these skills but also monitors their progress.As a physics professor, I often find myself torn between competing educational goals. On the one hand, most courses have a laundry list of fundamental theories and techniques that must be taught if the students are to advance further in the subject. On the other hand, there are a number of higher cognitive skills that I would also like to emphasize. The cognitive skills are more useful in life, but how much subject matter can I reasonably sacrifice to make room for teaching them?Traditional teaching methods reinforce the course content by assigning busy work — practice makes perfect, after all. Homework assignments consist of simple “plug and chug” problems that students can solve easily by finding the appropriate formula. While such assignments do help students learn the main topics of a course and prepare for the inevitable final exam, they promote a very limited style of problem-solving. More importantly, they provide little motivation for students to absorb the lessons of scientific thought.One solution is to raise the bar on the problems. Why not strip them of their hand-holding language, and present information in a more realistic setting? The result may be too difficult for one student, but is probably suitable for a group of students. Researchers in physics education at the University of Minnesota, for example, have created an archive of such context-rich problems for their introductory physics courses1. Context-rich problems force students to practice some of the cognitive skills used by experts, in particular the skill of analyzing a problem qualitatively before looking for the proper formula.I don’t wish to bore my readers, so I will present the briefest possible example of this qualitative analysis. When confronted with a collision problem, students should ask themselves whether friction is an important factor before they look up Newton’s laws. Figuring out how a problem relates to known principles is the first step taken by experts when they approach a new situation. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more