Top-Ranked Argonauts Season Ends in Semifinals

first_imgTop-Ranked Argonauts Season Ends in Semifinals May 11, 2007ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, Fla. – Top-ranked West Florida’s (26-4) impressive season came to an end against sixth-ranked Lynn University on Friday. Lynn defeated West Florida, 5-0, in the semifinals of the NCAA Division II National Championships at Sanlando Park. Last season the Argonauts were defeated 5-2 by the Fighting Knights in the national semifinals in Kansas City.The Fighting Knights swept the doubles action, earning all three points. Dante Bottini (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Nicolas Barrientos (Cali, Colombia) were defeated 8-5 in the first position. Diego Zorzi (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and his partner Luis Arboleda (Medellin, Colombia) were defeated 8-6 in the second position. Argonaut teammates Eduardo Cavasotti (Florianopolis, Brazil) and his partner Luiz Bernardi (Campinas, Brazil) were also lost 9-7 in the third position, giving the Fighting Knights the 3-0 lead.Following the doubles action, and needing five out of a six possible points, the Argonauts fell short against the Fighting Knights. Playing in the third position, 38th ranked Barrientos was defeated in straight sets, giving the Fighting Knights a comfortable 4-0 lead. Seventh-ranked Zorzi, playing in the first position, was also defeated in straight sets, finishing the match and securing Lynn’s spot in the NCAA Division II championship final.The Argonauts posted a 27-4 record, finishing the season with a .867 winning percentage. Against Gulf South Conference opponents, the Argonauts posted a 9-1 record, with a .900 conference winning percentage. The Argonauts were also ranked first in the nation during the regular season, and runner-up in the GSC Tournament.Diego Zorzi posted a 14-2 singles record, finishing the season with a .875 winning percentage including a 4-2 record in the first position and a 10-0 record in the second position. In doubles Zorzi was an impressive 21-3 record this season, including a 1-0 record in the first position and a 20-3 record in the second position, finishing with a .875 winning percentage in doubles. Zorzi was nationally ranked seventh in singles and 19th in doubles with partner Luis Arboleda.Dante Bottini recorded a 15-4 singles record, finishing the season with a .789 winning percentage in singles, including a 12-4 record in the first position and a 3-0 record in the second position. In doubles Bottini posted an impressive 24-4 record in the first position this season, finishing with a .856 winning percentage. Bottini was nationally ranked sixth in singles and second in doubles with partner Nicolas Barrientos. Bottini was also named NCAA Division II/Intercollegiate Tennis Association South Region Senior of The Year.Nicolas Barrientos posted a 16-10 singles record, finishing the season with a .615 winning percentage, including a 2-1 record in the first position, a 4-3 record in the second position and a 10-4 record in the third position. In doubles Barrientos was an impressive 24-4 record this season in the first position, and finished the season with a .857 winning percentage in doubles. Barrientos was nationally ranked 38th in singles and second in doubles with partner Bottini.Eduardo Cavasotti finished with a 12-10 singles record, finishing the season with a .545 winning percentage in singles, including a 4-3 record in the third position and a 7-6 record in the fourth position. In doubles Cavasotti posted a 20-9 record, including a 1-0 record in the first position, a 4-2 record in the second position, and a 16-6 in the third position, finishing the season with a .690 winning percentage in doubles. Cavasotti was nationally ranked 44th in singles.Luis Arboleda posted a 18-5 singles record, finishing the season with a .783 winning percentage, including a 3-0 in the third position, a 3-1 record in the fourth position and 7-4 in the fifth position. In doubles Arboleda put together a 26-4 record, including a 20-4 record in the second position and a 4-0 record in the third position, finishing the season with a .867 winning percentage in doubles. Arboleda was nationally ranked 19th in doubles.Luiz Bernardi earned a 16-4 singles record, finishing the season with a .800 winning percentage in singles, including a 3-1 record in the fourth position, a 5-0 record in the fifth position and a 6-3 record in the sixth position. In doubles Bernardi posted a 20-9 record, including 4-0 in the fourth position and a 13-8 record in the third position. He finished the season with a .690 winning percentage in doubles.Vivian Chhetri posted a 7-4 singles record, finishing the season with a .636 winning percentage in singles, including a 2-0 record in the third and fourth position and 2-1 record in the fifth position. In doubles, Chhetri was a perfect 7-0 in the third position.Mark McGuigan recorded a 6-2 singles record, finishing the season with a .750 winning percentage in singles, including a 2-0 record in the fifth position and a 4-2 record in the sixth position. In doubles McGuigan posted an 1-0 record.Marco Matteucci posted a 5-0 singles record, with three victories in the fifth position and three in the sixth position. In doubles, Matteucci was 2-0 with one victory in the second position and one in the third position.Gui Jasmin posted a 1-0 singles record in the sixth position. In doubles Jasmin was 1-0 in the third position. (By Gui Amaral Jasmin) Print Friendly Version Sharelast_img read more

Ukah Harps on Discipline as Prelims Take Centre Stage

first_imgHe commended Governor Ifeanyi Okowa of Delta State for his foresight of reviving the tournament courtesy of a partnership with Zenith Bank Plc.Ukah said: “The Governor loves catch-them-young programmes and this is just one of them. We are happy that Zenith Bank also supported us to make this a reality,“This is a good initiative and I am happy for the young ones because they have something to look forward to every year. It is interesting to see the“The competition is meant to boost their talents but along the line we expect them to be of good conduct. It is all round education and sports because these are the leaders of tomorrow.”The kick-off of the competition took place on Monday at the St Patrick’s College while the preliminaries have started across the 25 Local Government Areas of the State.About 850 private and public schools are taking part in the youth football developmental tournament in the state.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram ZENITH /DELTA PRINCIPALS’ CUPDelta State Commissioner for Basic and Secondary Education, Chief Patrick Ukah, has charged schools taking part in the ongoing Principals’ Cup Football competition to be disciplined and well-behaved.Ukah stated that it was important to teach the youths morals even as they are trying to develop their career in football. Patrick Ukahlast_img read more

Left to lead: As the veteran of SU’s defense, Megill looks to carry on a proud tradition

first_imgThe impact of the hit echoed throughout the Carrier Dome. Seven minutes into the first game of his Syracuse career, Brian Megill proved he belonged out on the field as a starter. The freshman defender drilled Denver’s Alex Drexler along the left sideline, leaving him down on the ground in pain and knocking him out of the game. The crushing hit sent a woozy Drexler wobbling to the sideline with a concussion and officially established Megill as a rising star in college lacrosse. ‘Everybody kind of knew after that hit, this guy’s the real deal and people who didn’t know about him were about to find out because he was able to blow this kid up,’ former SU goaltender John Galloway said. ‘And I’ll never forget it. It was against Denver, and we all kind of looked at each other and felt much more at ease. ‘We knew that this kid wasn’t worried, he wasn’t scared to play and he was going to be special on Syracuse.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Through two years, Megill has lived up to that billing. He went on to start every game during his first year, becoming the first freshman defender to do so under head coach John Desko. And Megill brought that physical presence to a stifling defensive unit that ranked among the best in the country. But now, the junior is expected to do more following the graduation of All-Americans Galloway, John Lade, Joel White and Tom Guadagnolo. As the lone returning starter on defense, it is on Megill’s shoulders to lead the unit and carry on the proud tradition. ‘The last time that I talked to him, I told him that it was his defense now,’ Lade said. ‘He’s got to definitely work harder than any other defenseman in the country, and he’s definitely got to be ready to play some great attackmen.’ His teammates and coaches rave about his work ethic. His intensity and physicality caught their attention immediately during the fall of his freshman year. And Guadagnolo and his former teammates all say the 6-foot, 226-pound Megill is the total package as a defender — strong enough to stop a bull dodger like Denver’s 6-foot-4, 210-pound attack Mark Matthews, but also quick enough to stick with Duke’s Jordan Wolf, a speedy 5-foot-9, 170-pound attack. While Lade and Galloway couldn’t pick out a flaw in the preseason All-American’s game, Megill knows of one glaring weakness that has been there since high school. He’s gotten quicker over the years, but he’s still not quick enough. White could see the frustration on Megill’s face as he chased Cornell attack Rob Pannell around the Carrier Dome field to no avail. With top cover man Lade out with an injury, Pannell torched Syracuse for six points, scoring two of his three goals against Megill in the second quarter as SU fell for the first and only time of the regular season in 2011. ‘I learned a lot,’ Megill said. ‘I learned I was still really slow because Rob Pannell is fast. He’s a great attackman, best I’ve seen in a long, long time.’ With that game in the back of his mind, Megill entered the offseason determined to get faster. His brother, Ray, a former All-American defender at Maryland, had been telling him his footwork needed improvement since high school. But Megill could get by using his superior strength to overpower opponents then and didn’t take his brother’s advice. This past offseason, the agility drills he once ignored became a part of his routine. He kept a speed ladder, cones, parachute and weighted vest in the back of his truck. ‘There’s times where he would just at the most random point in the day, he would just hop up and say, ‘I’m going to go for a run or I’m going to go workout,” Ray Megill said. ‘So he definitely does have a tireless work ethic.’ Megill tested himself even more when he spent part of the summer living with his brother in Rockville, Md. Ray Megill put him through CrossFit workouts, an unconventional fitness program designed to increase endurance and push athletes to their limits. The workouts can be as short as five minutes or as long as an hour. From up-downs and tire flips to box jumps and medicine ball training, the intense sessions were grueling. But Megill was hungry to get better, motivated by his struggles against Pannell last April. ‘I use that game as my drive to workout and to get better because I feel like I can play so much better and do better,’ Megill said. ‘And he’s one of the guys that I think about when I’m working out, that pushes me even harder, that gets me going that when I’m sitting down watching TV, I’m like, ‘I wonder what he’s doing.” That work ethic has defined Megill’s entire Syracuse career. Megill wasn’t highly touted coming out of Arthur L. Johnson High School in Clark, N.J., but he separated himself from the rest of his class and forced his way into the discussion for the open starting spot on defense during fall practice. The young defender was a pest, slashing and laying hits on big-time attack Cody Jamieson and Chris Daniello, who had helped the Orange to two straight national titles before he arrived. White remembers Megill injecting life into a dead practice with a big hit or a fast-break goal, telling his teammates through his actions to pick up the intensity. ‘He wasn’t afraid to come across the middle and stir up things even in practice,’ White said. ‘I can definitely remember a couple of times him coming across the middle and laying someone out and really spicing up practice a little bit.’ Through his hustle at practice, Megill earned the respect of his teammates in the locker room. Guadagnolo said the young defender pushed them to get better. He yelled at juniors and seniors if he felt they could go harder — something rarely seen in an underclassman. And Megill also made an impression through his actions in the weight room. Megill was often seen in a full sweat suit on a treadmill overlooking the football weight room as he tried to shed pounds and improve his conditioning. Multiple times, Guadagnolo recalled seeing Megill running after practice when everyone else had already left for the night. ‘Even if he didn’t say something, just other guys seeing him doing it, it would change their perspective on things, and they would start doing it,’ Guadagnolo said. ‘‘Oh man, this guy’s only a sophomore, and he’s working harder than you or he’s working harder than me.’ Guys would be embarrassed, so now we need to start doing it, too.’ His relentless drive struck Galloway during the fall of Megill’s freshman year. In the corner of Wohl Field before a practice, Megill approached the junior goaltender, who could tell the rookie had a lot on his mind. The defender was agonizing over the decision to redshirt or play as a freshman, and he sought advice from Galloway. The quick conversation ended with Galloway giving him a vote of confidence, telling Megill he could earn the starting spot after seeing his aggressive style of play and eagerness to learn. In that moment, Galloway said he first realized Megill would be special. About five months later, his eye-opening hit against Denver proved it. And two years later, the lacrosse world knows his name as one of the top players in the game, just as Galloway predicted. ‘I told people his freshman year, ‘He’s going to go down as one of the best defenders that Syracuse University’s ever had,” Galloway said. ‘His physicality, his stick skills, he just has that special something that you’re looking for in a teammate.’ rjgery@syr.edu Comments Published on February 15, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Ryne: rjgery@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more