German Magazine Stands by Ronaldo’s Rape Allegation

first_imgThe German magazine that reported a rape allegation made against footballer Cristiano Ronaldo says it has “no reason” to doubt the authenticity of key documents used in its story.Ronaldo, 33, denies assaulting Kathryn Mayorga at a Las Vegas hotel in 2009.Lawyers representing the Juventus player said on Wednesday that documents had been “completely fabricated”. But Der Spiegel said: “We have hundreds of documents from different sources that substantiate our reporting.”It added in a statement: “We stand by our reporting. We have no reason to believe that those documents are not authentic.“Furthermore, as always and before publishing every single article in Der Spiegel, we have meticulously fact-checked our information and had it legally reviewed.“The statement that was issued by Ronaldo’s lawyer, Peter Christiansen on behalf of Cristiano Ronaldo presents the usual path that Mr. Ronaldo and his lawyers have taken in the past when unsuccessfully fighting our investigative work.”The magazine’s story centres on a questionnaire, which it says came from Ronaldo’s lawyers, in which the Portugal international admits Mayorga, 34, said “no” and “stop” during the alleged attack.In a statement released on Wednesday, Christiansen said the documents were “pure inventions” and the result of a 2015 cyber attack, during which “electronic data was stolen” from “dozens of entities (including law firms) in different parts of Europe”.He added: “This hacker tried to sell such information, and a media outlet irresponsibly ended up publishing some of the stolen documents, significant parts of which were altered and/or completely fabricated.”Der Spiegel responded by saying: “In our article, we quote two versions of a document with statements by Mr. Ronaldo.“It’s a questionnaire that comes from his lawyers and describes the course of the night, in which the alleged rape occurred. The first version of this questionnaire, in which Ronaldo is quoted as saying that Ms Mayorga said ‘no’ and ‘stop’, is consistent with many details of Ms Mayorga’s description of the incident.“Both also state that he apologised to her afterwards. In a later version of this questionnaire, Mr. Ronaldo denies the accusation of rape and denies apologising to Ms Mayorga.”Christiansen said his client’s position continues to be that “what happened in 2009 in Las Vegas was completely consensual”.He added: “So that there are no doubts: Cristiano Ronaldo vehemently denies all the accusations in this civil action, in consistency with what he has done in the last nine years.”Mayorga’s lawyers have now called for any documents to be handed over to “the appropriate law enforcement agencies” to help resolve any discrepancies.They added they wanted to review any evidence that showed documents had been altered or fabricated.Der Spiegel also believes Ronaldo’s representatives have changed their narrative regarding the alleged payment that was made to Mayorga by Ronaldo’s lawyers in 2010.Mayorga, who the magazine says filed a report with Las Vegas police shortly after the alleged incident, reportedly reached an out-of-court settlement with Ronaldo involving a $375,000 (£288,000) payment for agreeing never to go public with the allegations.Christiansen says Ronaldo does not deny he entered into an agreement, but “the reasons that led him to do so are at least to be distorted”. He added: “This agreement is by no means a confession of guilt.”Der Spiegel said: “When we published an article about the settlement agreement between Ms Mayorga and Mr. Ronaldo in 2017, his advisors called it ‘nothing but a piece of journalistic fiction’.“Now, Mr. Ronaldo admits that he agreed to that settlement.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Tyus Battle overcomes slow start to lead Syracuse past Michigan State to Sweet 16

first_imgDETROIT — Tyus Battle shook his head. He clapped his hands, and he beat his chest. Syracuse’s sophomore swingman was visibly frustrated the entire first half.In the NCAA Tournament, against a Michigan State group that entered the NCAA Tournament ranked fifth, the Orange’s leading scorer was nowhere to be found. He’d missed all four of his shots and split a pair of free throws. He was out-hustled to a long rebound that gave MSU another possession, and he was stripped going for a layup on a fastbreak.Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim wasn’t happy with his team’s offense. And he felt he needed more from the team’s two star guards, Battle and Frank Howard.“I told them at halftime, ‘We can’t win without you two guys,’” Boeheim said. “‘You’ve got to go. Tyus, you’ve got to go.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange needed its star player, and finally he delivered. Battle scored 16 second-half points en route to helping No. 11 seed Syracuse (23-13, 8-10 Atlantic Coast) beat No. 3 seed Michigan State (30-5, 16-2 Big Ten), 55-53, on Sunday afternoon. It continues Syracuse’s improbable run through the NCAA Tournament, with its next game a rematch against No. 2 seed Duke in Omaha, Nebraska.Battle’s second-half run started with a tough floater over an MSU player two minutes in. He added another jumper, getting fouled in the process and converting the and-1.In the first half, against a strong Michigan State defense, Battle settled for tough jump shots and was short on a few. He started taking the ball toward the rim more in the second half.With about seven minutes left, Battle had the ball on the left wing, with the Syracuse support section right behind him. Former Syracuse star Derrick Coleman, who is second on Syracuse’s all-time scoring list, stood up from his seat and yelled, “They can’t take you Tyus, they can’t take you.”Shortly after, Battle’s job would get even harder when Howard fouled out. One of Syracuse’s big three was out and the Orange was still down four.“Me and Tyus just looked at each other and said, ‘We’re not going to let this game slip out of our fingers,’” Oshae Brissett, SU’s second-leading scorer, said. “We knew that this game was going to fall on us.”Tyus Battle didn’t hit a field goal in the first half. In the second half, his 16 led Syracuse to a win. Alexandra Moreo | Senior Staff PhotographerBattle, along with teammates Marek Dolezaj and Bourama Sidibe, picked up more points at the line for the Orange. That, combined with Oshae Brissett’s tough layup and stellar defense, helped give SU the lead.But the game was still in the balance. And to win, Syracuse still needed a bit more. And it needed it to come from Battle.With the clock ticking down under a minute and Syracuse up just one, Battle had the ball. He knew that Michigan State would try and pack the middle and stop his driving lanes. The Spartans knew he was going to shoot the ball.And as he’s done all year long, Battle made the clutch shot for Syracuse — a midrange jumper with 47 seconds to go to open up the three-point cushion SU needed.“I’m not worried about the first defender. I know I can beat him any time I want,” Battle said. “Once I went left, I saw he was with me a little bit, so I did a little step back just to clear space, and I didn’t get too deep, and I was open for a shot.”Against a weaker TCU team, the Orange was able to scrap by without its star player. That wouldn’t work against the Spartans. And not without Howard there to back him up.It took him a while, but Battle delivered.“With Frank out he’s going to have the ball and we’re going to go with what he can do,” Boeheim said. “And he made all the big plays in the second half.” Comments Published on March 18, 2018 at 8:51 pm Contact Tomer: tdlanger@syr.edu | @tomer_langer Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Kolkata: birthplace of the Calcutta Cup, and still India’s rugby hub

first_img– ‘Just for a lark’ –But in recent years there have been two new kids on the scene, Future Hope and the Jungle Crows.Both were started by Brits — a former bank manager and an ex-diplomat — and both have won the local Calcutta Cup multiple times with teams made up of former street children.The clubs are also about more than just rugby, using the sport to help both boys and girls from Kolkata’s poorer areas — of which there are many — on the road towards a brighter future.Paul Walsh, 50, says he started Jungle Crows in 2004 with two compatriots “just for a lark”. The other two have moved on but Walsh, from Chester in northern England and now an MBE, stayed.His Khelo Rugby project involves taking a rugby ball into poor communities, gaining children’s trust and helping them in other areas, including giving them money for schooling and training.“You get the odd-shaped ball out, you get the rugby ball out, and it will light up any child’s face,” Walsh told AFP. “They’re interested. So that initial enthusiasm, we just kind of build on that really.”– Dire poverty –“My home situation is very bad,” said Vicky, 19, who started playing rugby 10 years ago and is now at college thanks to Jungle Crows, and helping to coach the next generation.As he speaks, a group of children delightedly splatter through the mud playing British Bulldog, a rough-and-tumble variant of tag, on a piece of wasteland near the Kolkata port where families live in dire poverty.Future Hope founder Tim Grandage, 60, meanwhile first came to Kolkata in 1987 to work for HSBC bank and was “shocked” by the number of kids on the street.Getting them to play rugby taught them discipline and teamwork, and learning the rules of the game also got many of the children used to a school setting, he says.“We discovered that if you started to teach rugby theory in the classroom, the children weren’t so worried about getting into a classroom,” Grandage told AFP.Three decades later, the organisation has a school with several hundred children. One ex-pupil now runs the Indian operations of Decathlon, the French sporting retailer.“I hated banking, it was boring as anything, although my colleagues were fantastic,” Grandage said, adding: “I always keep a silver rupee from 1840 in my back pocket.”Share on: WhatsApp England’s Brad Shields scores their eighth try against Italy in the Six Nations ChampionshipKolkata, India | AFP |  When England and Scotland play rugby each year, the winner hoists the Calcutta Cup — a relic of the sport’s roots in India, and a nod to the city where it is still thriving to this day.In the 1870s, when the Calcutta Rugby Football Club started charging for drinks, interest among British colonials waned and it was disbanded leaving 270 silver rupees in the kitty, or so story goes.These were melted down to make the Calcutta Cup, the exquisite and now battered trophy still contested annually by England and Scotland, with cobras for handles and an elephant perched on top.While the trophy went on to become one of the most famous prizes in rugby, the sport also survived in Kolkata, as the hot and bustling former capital of British India is now known.Indeed today it is the hub of rugby in India, and doing much good in the deprived city in the process, thanks in part to two British expats who gave up their careers to make Kolkata their home.– The other Calcutta Cup –A big name in Kolkata’s sporting scene is the Calcutta Football and Cricket Club (CCFC), its walls festooned with photos of sporting captains of yore.Founded in 1792, it is the oldest cricket club outside Britain, only five years younger than the Marylebone Cricket Club at Lord’s, known as the ‘home of cricket’.But the CCFC is not just about cricket.“The ‘F’ in CCFC is for rugby and not football,” points out sports coordinator Saurav Chaterjee, as members play darts in the bar.One of the many trophies in the packed cabinets behind him is none other than the Calcutta Cup.But this is a different trophy from the more famous one now housed in the Museum of Rugby in Twickenham, England.Kolkata’s own Calcutta Cup, smaller than its namesake, is keenly contested every year by about eight Kolkata clubs, one of several local and national competitions.Before independence in 1947, winners included British military teams like the King’s Own Regiment.But then home-grown sides like the CCFC, the police, La Martinere Old Boys and a team from the city’s Armenian community took over.“We have a very huge history here of rugby in Kolkata,” said Ryan Galstaun, 37, a member of that community refereeing boys’ and girls’ sevens in sweltering heat.last_img read more