Backpacker Esquire New Yorker Wired Lead Subdued Ellies

first_imgFour of the magazine industry’s iconic editors—Rolling Stone’s Jann Wenner, Tina Brown, and Vogue’s Anna Wintour and Vanity Fair’s Graydon Carter (left to right, above)—presented photographer Annie Leibovitz (center) with a general excellence Ellie—the first ever to be awarded to an individual, not a magazine.Wenner accepted Rolling Stone’s award for a profile of the late writer and novelist David Foster Wallace, who committed suicide last fall. “David won a National Magazine Award for a piece he did for us years ago,” Wenner said. “He was one of the true talents.”‘Chainsaw-Wielding’Texas Monthly editor Evan Smith delivered the best acceptance speech of the night, thanking everyone from George W. Bush and Karl Rove to “chainsaw-wielding murderers” and Willie Nelson, for making the job of covering the state of Texas an “easy” one. (Texas Monthly won for general excellence, 250,000 to 500,000 circulation.)Despite its elder demographic, AARP the Magazine won an Ellie for best interactive feature online, taking out National Geographic, Salon and Wired.com.After Bicycling won an Ellie, its editor, Loren Mooney, said: “Bicycling? Seriously?!?”There were few other surprises, albeit big ones: Field & Stream won a general excellence award (1,000,000 to 2,000,000 circulation), beating the New Yorker, Vogue and Popular Science.Reader’s Digest, nominated for the first time in 20 years, won a general excellence award  (over 2,000,000 circulation), beating Martha Stewart Living, Real Simple, National Geographic—which won three Ellies last year—and Time.Said editor Peggy Northrop: “This is for all of my friends who said I was crazy for taking this job.” SEE ALSO: FOLIO: Q+A with Northrop [PHOTOS: Steve Friedman] But unlike other years, given the seemingly endless waves of layoffs, magazine closings and reports of hemorrhaging ad pages that have rocked the industry in the last 12 months, this didn’t feel like a celebration.Backpacker, Esquire, Wired and the New Yorker led the awards field, winning three Ellies each.Jimmy Fallon, host of NBC’s Late Night, presented the evening’s first two awards, for excellence online. Backpacker editor Jonathan Dorn, in accepting the Ellie for Backpacker.com, said he hoped it would allow him to keep his job for a year, “maybe two.”“This gives us air cover,” he said.Chris Anderson, accepting Wired’s third Ellie, apologized for his sudden ubiquity: “This is usually the part where [New York magazine editor] Adam Moss or [New Yorker editor] David Remnick start apologizing.”Anderson also thanked his boss at Condé Nast, Si Newhouse, for approving a cover he told Newhouse would “tank.” “Si said, ‘Oh, it doesn’t matter.’” RELATED: FOLIO:’s Ellies Twitter Stream NEW YORK—The 44th annual National Magazine Awards—a normally boozy, raucous affair—were held during a gala ceremony at Jazz @ Lincoln Center here Thursday.last_img read more

Buy four new Tile Mate trackers for 60 get a Google Home

first_img Amazon Gadgets Smart Home Video Games TV and Movies See It Best Buy Watch Google Home Mini’s new side touch function in action Mentioned Above Google Home Mini (Coral) Google Mini $29 $379 $29 Now playing: Watch this: CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $29 Tags See it See Itcenter_img CNET Just yesterday, while visiting my parents, I had a lightbulb moment: My mom needs a Tile. That’s because she often can’t remember where in the house she left her phone. But her keys are always parked on the key hook.I’ll come back to that after this important message: For a limited time, and while supplies last, Best Buy is offering a free Google Home Mini when you purchase a Tile Mate four-pack for $59.99. The Mini — available in your choice of four colors — is a $50 value. Update: I goofed! Best Buy’s page made it look like you could save $10 on the 4-pack and still get the Mini for free. Alas, the combination comes to $60, not $50. Still a great deal, but I do apologize for the error.See it at Best BuyI’ve long been a big fan of the Tile, and I especially like this newer version that has better range and a replaceable battery. In the aforementioned scenario, my mom just needs to double-press the Tile button and her phone will ring — even if it’s set to silent. Likewise, the phone can be used to locate the keychain.As for the Mini, everything you need to know can be found in CNET’s Google Home Mini review. It probably goes without saying that if yours is an Android-centric household, you’ll love the little smart speaker.And I love this deal. Get it while you can! 18 Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Google Home Mini The Cheapskate Review • The Google Home Mini is a worthy competitor to the Amazon Echo Dot News • Google pushes its Assistant in cars with Anker Roav Bolt Dell How To • Prime Day 2019 final hours: Best Target deals you can get right now See It Bonus deal: Game time! Thimbleweed Park is like X-Files meets Maniac Mansion, and in fact the game comes from the creators of the latter. It normally runs $9, but for a limited time, Epic Games is offering Thimbleweed Park for free.See it at Epic GamesAs with previous Epic giveaways, you’ll need an account and the company’s client software — both also free, of course.Bonus deal No. 2: It’s the 20-year anniversary of cult-classic movie Office Space, and I think it holds up pretty well. So, yeahhhh, I’m going to need you to go ahead and buy Office Space (HD) for $4.99, which is only a dollar more than the rental price. (It’s also available from Fandango for that price.)See it at AmazonFun fact: David Herman, who played Michael Bolton in the movie, also voices Mr. Frond on Bob’s Burgers. Looking for more trivia, history and more? Read Rolling Stone’s oral history of Office Space, then follow it up with The Ringer’s oral history of Office Space.Now if you’ll excuse me, I have a thousand more TPS reports to file.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! Comments 0:33 Share your voicelast_img read more

Indian rupee falls to new low since Narendra Modi came to power

first_imgThe Indian rupee hit a new low of 68.86 against the US dollar on Thursday, as foreign investors continue to sell their holdings in view of an imminent interest rate hike by the US Federal Reserve next month. The previous all-time low for the domestic currency was 68.85 on August 28, 2013.On that day, the rupee experienced its biggest single-day fall in 18 years but gained later to close at 66.24.Narendra Modi was voted to power in May 2014 when his BJP-led NDA swept the general elections, ousting the Congress-led UPA that remained in office for 10 years.Earlier, on Thursday, the rupee opened 19 paise lower at 68.76.Foreign institutional investors (FIIs/FPIs) have been on a selling spree in November, offloading debt and equities worth $3.18 billion, the Mint reported.The fall is not confined to the Indian rupee alone. “Asian currencies’ drop to a seven-year low will probably deter regional central banks from easing monetary policies as the prospects of higher U.S. rates spurred capital outflows,” Geojit BNP Paribas said in a note on Thursday morning.The BSE Sensex closed at 25,860 on Thursday, down 192 points, or 0.74 percent. Top index losers were Tata Motors, Sun Pharma and Axis Bank.”Continued weakness in rupee against dollar, last hour of expiry square-off and the disruptions in Rajya debate over demonetization have dragged the market. This phase of consolidation is likely to continue in the near-term given the domestic setbacks and losing strength of the EMs due to buoyant bond yield,” Vinod Nair, Head of Research, Geojit BNP Paribas Financial Services, said in a note.The BSE Bankex closed 1.45 percent, with the top losers being Kotak Mahindra Bank, Axis Bank, Federal Bank and IndusInd Bank. State Bank of India ended with gains of 1.14 percent at Rs 261.70.last_img read more

Can expert reasoning be taught

first_img“Students who are used to working on well-structured problems struggle when confronted with the multiple challenges of more complex tasks.” writes Professor Ogilvie (Iowa State University), who not only assigns context-rich problems in his course but has also begun researching their effect on the problem-solving strategies adopted by students. The problems are implemented in a computer-assisted learning environment of his own design. When a student group logs into the system, a context-rich problem is presented with a selection of information resources that may or may not be relevant. The students are asked to write not just the solution, but describe their thought process in categories corresponding to the typical stages of expert reasoning: qualitative analysis, identification of relevant concepts, ongoing monitoring (evaluation of the solution as it progresses), and validation of the solution obtained. The beauty of this system is that it not only guides the student into a more ‘expert’ mode, it also tracks the time spent at each step, the resources accessed, and so on.So, has this learning environment helped train a new generation of experts?The answer is yes, with some caveats. First, as with any group project it is hard to track which students are working and which ones are learning. Second, Ogilvie’s course presents only five such problems to the students. (There is still all the core material to get through, after all!)As for the results, there is some good news and some bad news.In the first problem of the course, students completed the ‘qualitative analysis’ section an average of ten minutes before completing the assignment. In the last problem, this section was completed about twenty minutes beforehand. Another encouraging point is that very few students wasted time reading all the available information in later problems. “Taken together, the student groups show some progression towards expert-like behavior” Ogilvie writes, “earlier qualitative analysis and more selective requests for information.” By the end of the course, students were also identifying the most relevant concepts earlier.In other words, the students grew more likely to think about the problem before attacking it. That’s the good news!The bad news is that there is no evidence for improvement in one of the most important aspects of expert reasoning: ongoing monitoring. Monitoring is a form of critical thinking, the general (and highly useful) cognitive skill of evaluating the quality of information. Experts in a field will examine their solutions repeatedly as they work them out. Have any of their initial assumptions been violated along the way? Is the solution making progress, or is it getting sidetracked? Is the math becoming simpler or more complicated? If an expert senses that a solution isn’t working well, they may abandon it to look for a better approach.In all fairness, this is also probably the most difficult skill to measure. Computer tracking can only show that students usually filled in the “monitoring” summary right before completing the assignment. No doubt this skill can be taught as well, but it might lie beyond the scope of computer instruction. I still vividly remember one of my professors taking only ten minutes to solve a physics problem that had taken me hours to work out. Perhaps the lesson of monitoring solutions can only be learned by sincerely regretting the time you just wasted.Note: 1groups.physics.umn.edu/physed/ … rch/CRP/crintro.htmlCitation: “Understanding Student Pathways in Context-rich Problems” by Pavlo Antonenko, John Jackman, Piyamart Kumsaikaew, Rahul Marathe, Dale Niederhauser, Craig Ogilvie, and Sarah Ryan is available online at xxx.arxiv.org/abs/physics/0701284By Ben Mathiesen, Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Can expert reasoning be taught? (2007, February 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-02-expert-taught.html In addition to mastering a large body of knowledge, successful researchers must acquire a host of high-level cognitive skills: critical thinking, “framing” a problem, ongoing evaluation of the solution as it progresses, and ruthless validation of one’s final answer. Some students pick these skills up on their own as they advance towards their degree, especially those who participate in research, but they rarely appear in a curriculum. Students working on a context-rich problem fall naturally into two groups. Teams above the line demonstrate expert-like behavior, in that they completed their qualitative analysis of the problem before accessing the relevant information and submitting a solution. Those teams below the line demonstrate novice-like behavior, in that they appear to read through as many resources as they can before attempting a solution and submit their analysis of the problem only after a solution has been recognized. Credit: Craig Ogilvie Expert mathematicians stumped by simple subtractionscenter_img Explore further Professor Craig Ogilvie of Iowa State University has developed a problem-solving environment that not only encourages students to practice these skills but also monitors their progress.As a physics professor, I often find myself torn between competing educational goals. On the one hand, most courses have a laundry list of fundamental theories and techniques that must be taught if the students are to advance further in the subject. On the other hand, there are a number of higher cognitive skills that I would also like to emphasize. The cognitive skills are more useful in life, but how much subject matter can I reasonably sacrifice to make room for teaching them?Traditional teaching methods reinforce the course content by assigning busy work — practice makes perfect, after all. Homework assignments consist of simple “plug and chug” problems that students can solve easily by finding the appropriate formula. While such assignments do help students learn the main topics of a course and prepare for the inevitable final exam, they promote a very limited style of problem-solving. More importantly, they provide little motivation for students to absorb the lessons of scientific thought.One solution is to raise the bar on the problems. Why not strip them of their hand-holding language, and present information in a more realistic setting? The result may be too difficult for one student, but is probably suitable for a group of students. Researchers in physics education at the University of Minnesota, for example, have created an archive of such context-rich problems for their introductory physics courses1. Context-rich problems force students to practice some of the cognitive skills used by experts, in particular the skill of analyzing a problem qualitatively before looking for the proper formula.I don’t wish to bore my readers, so I will present the briefest possible example of this qualitative analysis. When confronted with a collision problem, students should ask themselves whether friction is an important factor before they look up Newton’s laws. Figuring out how a problem relates to known principles is the first step taken by experts when they approach a new situation. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more