QPR still looking at trialist Campbell-Young

first_imgQPR have extended youngster Channing Campbell-Young’s trial.Campbell-Young, who turns 20 this Saturday, featured for Rangers’ development side in a recent match against Crystal Palace and was also selected for a game this evening against his former club Bolton.He was on Tottenham’s books before being signed by Wanderers, who released him this summer.He can play in a number of positions but is primarily a defensive midfielder.QPR’s line-up for the Under-23 game at the Macron Stadium also included Swiss goalkeeper Seny Dieng, who was recently signed by the club.See also:QPR sign keeper after youngster is sidelined for six monthsQPR look at two trialistsQPR quiz – can you get five out of five?QPR striker Polter a doubt for Newcastle gameTrialist features again in QPR U23 gamePolter and Luongo doubtful, but QPR trio availableFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Incredible Stasis in Evolution: What Does It Mean?

first_img1Venkatesh et al, “Ancient Noncoding Elements Conserved in the Human Genome,” Science, 22 December 2006: Vol. 314. no. 5807, p. 1892, DOI: 10.1126/science.1130708.2Wedmann, Bradler and Rust, “The first fossil leaf insect: 47 million years of specialized cryptic morphology and behavior,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, published online before print December 29, 2006, 10.1073/pnas.0606937104.Do you see how the evolutionary mindset works?  The thought never enters any evolutionist’s brain that evolutionary theory could be at fault.  No matter how bizarre, conflicting and falsifying the evidence, Darwin’s image must be worshipped and the sacrifices* must continue.  It doesn’t matter that no evolution happens in some lineages for tens or hundreds of millions of years (think about that!) for them to keep the pieces of their story straight, while evolution is extremely, fantastically rapid in other quarters.  In the time tree-swinging monkeys supposedly became philosophers, and all kinds of dramatic other changes took place, leaf-mimicking insects changed nada.  Are we to believe that the predators were all so stupid in this time never to catch on to the trick?  “Don’t eat me; I’m a leaf!”  Right.    Even more astonishing is the conservation of noncoding elements between sharks and humans.  Evolutionary theory is so plastic and malleable, like silly putty, (12/14/2004), it makes evolutionists downright silly, buddy.  We are asked to believe that all the radiations of fish into seahorses and angler fish and tunas showed more evolution of these elements from their cartilaginous swimming mates than 530 million years of evolution of all the other vertebrates—reptiles, birds, and every mammal from shrews to giraffes to elephants and man.  We are expected to trust the evolutionists because they are priests of Science and know the Truth of Almighty Darwin (t.o.a.d.).  Don’t be a toady.(Visited 84 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Quite often in phylogenetic research, evolutionists find examples of extreme conservation of genes or traits.  How they explain the lack of change is almost as interesting as the phenomenon itself.  Here are two recent examples.Your cousin the shark:  Surprise: you have more in common with horn sharks than bony fishes do.  Craig Venter’s international team found evidence for “Ancient Noncoding Elements Conserved in the Human Genome” and reported this in Science last week.1  They found more similarities in these noncoding regions between sharks and humans than between sharks and bony fish.  Here’s how they interpreted such an astonishing result:Thus, it appears that, even though cartilaginous fishes diverged from the human lineage before teleost fishes, higher proportions of regulatory elements are conserved between cartilaginous fishes and human than between teleost fishes and human.  This implies that the regulatory regions of teleost fishes have been evolving faster since their common ancestor diverged from the lineage that led to mammals.  The divergent regulatory regions in teleosts may be partly explained by the partitioning of regulatory elements between duplicate gene loci that arose from the fish-specific whole-genome duplication event in the ray-finned fish lineage.  Teleost fishes, with about 25,000 extant species, are the largest group of vertebrates and exhibit vast diversity in their morphology and adaptations.  The accelerated rate of evolution of regulatory regions may be an important factor in the rapid radiation and diversity of teleost fishes.Make like a leaf:  A fossil leaf-mimicking insect said to be 47 million years old is virtually identical to modern ones, reported Mongabay.com.  What this means, according to the article, is that this insect found a “time-tested strategy” to avoid predators.  The article calls this “an outstanding example of morphological and, probably, behavioral stasis.” It means that “leaf mimicry had already evolved early in the Eocene period when insect predators would have included birds, early primates, bats, and other insects.”  See also the story on Live Science.Update 12/29/2006: the paper in PNAS appeared online Dec. 29.2  Portions of the abstract demonstrate the degree of stasis of this fossil:…. Here we report the first fossil leaf insect, Eophyllium messelensis gen.  et sp.  nov., from 47-million-year-old deposits at Messel in Germany.  The new specimen, a male, is exquisitely preserved and displays the same foliaceous appearance as extant male leaf insects.  Clearly, an advanced form of extant angiosperm leaf mimicry had already evolved early in the Eocene.  We infer that this trait was combined with a special behavior, catalepsy or “adaptive stillness,” enabling Eophyllium to deceive visually oriented predators.  Potential predators reported from the Eocene are birds, early primates, and bats.  The combination of primitive and derived characters revealed by Eophyllium allows the determination of its exact phylogenetic position and illuminates the evolution of leaf mimicry for this insect group.  It provides direct evidence that Phylliinae originated at least 47 Mya…. This fossil leaf insect bears considerable resemblance to extant individuals in size and cryptic morphology, indicating minimal change in 47 million years.  This absence of evolutionary change is an outstanding example of morphological and, probably, behavioral stasis.This fossil was found in Europe, while most leaf-mimic insects live today in southeast Asia.  This indicates that leaf insects were much more widespread in the past.  It’s possible that fossil hunters missed finding them before now because the mimics were so good, people mistook them for leaves.    What traits did the authors feel were primitive?  Their paper tries to place the new fossil between the stick insects and modern leaf mimics, but admits that their origin is “poorly understood” and that “exact phylogenetic position of the Phylliinae within the phasmid phylogeny is unknown”.  It seems arbitrary, therefore, that their chart places the new insect halfway between the stick insects and the leaf insects, considering that the fossil shares many characteristics with extant leaf insects.  They only pointed to “straight fore femora and the absence of tergal thorn pads” as “primitive” traits resembling those of the stick insects; yet, clearly, this fossil was not primitive.  They restated at the end of the paper that this fossil is an example of “exceptional evolutionary stasis of a highly derived morphology, most likely coupled with very specialized cryptic behavior that lasted for [greater than or equal to] 47 million years.”    As to how exactly this morphology and behavior evolved, they suggested that necessity was the mother of invention: “In all probability,” they speculated, “this advanced type of crypsis evolved in concert with angiosperm leaves on which the insects feed.  It must have been caused by vigorous selection pressure by visually oriented predators” such as birds, lizards, bats and primates. last_img read more

Rails Rumble: Micro-App Competition Winners Announced

first_imgSo, that’s what the expert panel of judges and hordes of Rail-loving masses deigned the cream of the crop this year. What’s your take; do any of these apps inspire or excite you? Second Place: How’s My Code?How’s My Code is a peer review tool for developers to comment on, approve of, and flag commits. Email notifications allow users to come back to ongoing discussions. If you spend more time on GitHub than Facebook, this might be an app for you to check out.Here’s a screencast explaining the app:Third Place: TablesurfingUsing Facebook Connect, the Tablesurfing team created an app for those who are into impromptu dinner parties. “Like couchsurfing, but for tables,” Tablesurfing connects users who like to cook with users who are comfortable dining in the homes of strangers (i.e., the adventurous and hungry.) Of course, the concept is replete with issues (necessary critical mass of user adoption, sketch factor of inviting those weird “Internet people” into your home), but it’s a sweet idea with a nice UI.Check out the demo video here:Appearance Category Winner: LowdownLowdown (currently offline for post-Rumble revamping) is/was a drop-dead gorgeous task/project management tool for working with Cucumber. As the development team wrote, ‘If Cucumber lets us ‘describe how software should behave in plain text… in a business-readable domain-specific language’ then Lowdown is the tea party where thinly sliced sandwiches are served on nice platters instead of trying to swallow it whole.’ Full-featured and flexible, it was one of several related apps in the Rumble yet stood out for its pristine user interface that was a breeze to understand and use and a pleasure to look at. We look forward to playing around with the app more once it relaunches.Take a look at this demo in the meantime:Usefulness Category Winner: ZenVDN“Talk about ambitious – building a video delivery network for the Rumble is crazy!” So wrote expert and Viget Labs technology director Ben Scofield of ZenVDN. Perhaps the nature and scope of the project isn’t such a surprise when one considers that the team behind this project also constructed web video apps ZenCoder and Flix Cloud. Ambitious or not, the site is good-looking and designed for simplicity. ZenVDN encodes videos for the web and mobile devices, allows for HD resolution and embedding, and makes use of a global content delivery network. Truth be told, as it must be on a tech news blog, we were unsuccessful in our attempts to upload a video to our profile, and ironically, the app’s demo video was not embeddable.UPDATE: ZenVDN just emailed us this embeddable version of their demo:There’s something to be said for constructing a full-fledged application in 48 hours. There’s something else to be said for naming said application in such a way that conjures only the fondest memories of Dana Carvey in a platinum wig. Simply put, “Hurl makes HTTP requests. Enter a URL, set some headers, then view the response. Perfect for APIs.” Hurl comes from Pownce founder/Six Apart engineer Leah Culver and Chris Wanstrath and will officially launch soon.Completeness Category Winner: hurlCheck out the screencast for a demo:Innovation Category Winner: LAZEROIDS!!!This team built a neverending, massively mutliplayer, peer-to-peer version of Asteroids with sound design that had commenters raving (pew! pew!). LAZEROIDS!!! (sic) was moreover developed with complete disregard for IE support. Still, experts and commenters alike were impressed with the execution and simplicity of this app. You can check out the team’s blog for information on the architecture, or you can just go play the game. Solo Category Winner: AlertMe.tvOne is the loneliest number, and special consideration was given to the developers who chose to fly solo in this competition. One of our favorite apps – a well-designed, useful tool – was AlertMe.tv, a simple system for users’ opting in to notifications about their favorite TV shows. Email, SMS, or IM notifications are sent when new episodes are about to air. Adding new shows to the site’s database is also particularly simple. As someone who needs to be reminded when Saturday Night Live airs, I particularly appreciate this app. Congratulations to Jacques Crocker, the Rails Jedi of Silicon Valley. Couch potatoes the world around salute you. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Microapp#start jolie odell 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting In 48 hours last weekend, 237 developer teams competed and generated a total of 137 qualifying web applications, all developed with Ruby and Rails on the back end.The 2009 Rails Rumble was, according to organizers, the strongest yet in the contest’s history. (Disclosure: I was on the “expert panel” of judges for the Rumble and got a sneak peak at a significant handful of apps.)As microapps (as this particular brand of simple, single-function sites and widgets could be called) occupy an ever-increasing tract of Internet real estate, time-crunch events such as Startup Weekend and Rails Rumble serve as tests of skill and team-building challenges, not to mention endurance competitions as developers burn through hour after sleepless hour. Yet with each cycle, these events do produce a number of noteworthy apps that might grow into something more in the weeks and months to follow while teaching all developers valuable lessons about simplicity in interface design. Here’s a quick breakdown of the eight winning Rails Rumble applications.First Place: Hi.ImHi I’m is (yet another) service that aggregates a user‘s social streams to a centralized location, sort of like Retaggr, Chi.mp, and their ilk. The idea wasn’t the most innovative, as many of the 80 comments on this project noted, but the user experience was as simple as following the yellow brick road. The app was developed by San Jose-based web/mobile development shop Koombea. Related Posts last_img read more

HC notices on PIL against ‘Gaurav Yatra’

first_imgThe Rajasthan High Court on Friday issued notices to the State government and BJP State president Madan Lal Saini on a public interest litigation raising questions over the expenses incurred on Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje’s ongoing ‘Gaurav Yatra’. BJP president Amit Shah had flagged off the yatra from Charbhuja temple in Rajsamand on August 4.The petition, moved by lawyer Vibhuti Bhushan Sharma, has contended that since the ‘Gaurav Yatra’ was an initiative of the ruling BJP ahead of the State Assembly elections, no orders could be issued to the government departments to make arrangements for the march.The State government had ordered the Public Works Department on August 1 to make arrangements for setting up the stage, sound system and decoration for the yatra by inviting tenders for these works. The Information and Public Relations Department was also handed over the task of giving publicity to the yatra.A Division Bench headed by Chief Justice Pradeep Nandrajog asked the government counsel as to who was footing the bill for the yatra and issued notices to the respondents seeking their reply by August 16. The counsel representing the Chief Secretary and PWD informed the court that the impugned orders had since been withdrawn.The writ petition has named the Chief Secretary, PWD Principal Secretary and Chief Engineer and Mr. Saini as respondents. It said the yatra could not be described as a part of the government’s functioning, as the BJP itself had announced that its election campaign had started with the launch of the march.last_img read more