Members Of The Motet, TAB, & More Tribute Jamiroquai At Brooklyn Comes Alive [Audio/Videos]

first_imgIn one of the most highly anticipated and well-attended performances of Brooklyn Comes Alive 2017, members of The Motet assembled a handful of funky friends for a fantastic tribute to Jamiroquai on Sunday evening at the Music Hall of Williamsburg. With longtime aficionados Joey Porter (keyboards) and Dave Watts (drums) at the helm, the group led a spirited audience on a journey down the alleys and annals of yesteryear. Brooklyn Comes Alive’s swollen all-star band provided an authentic balance, at once true to Jamiroquai’s ethos yet adding their own personalities and flair to the timeless compositions. Along with Motet bandmates bassist Garrett Sayers, guitarist Ryan Jalbert, and vocalist Lyle Divinsky, Porter and Watts called upon awesome auxiliary players to round out a dynamite ensemble: the inimitable Jen Hartswick on trumpet and backup vocals, her trusty trombone foil Natalie Cressman, and RAQ/Electric Beethoven scientist Todd Stoops on another rack of synths and keyboards. BCA MVPs Maurice Brown (trumpet) and Snarky Puppy’s Nate Werth (percussion) also joined in on the funk during the hour-plus adventure. Jamiroquai is back in the cultural consciousness in 2017 with their tremendous new album Automaton, released in March, yet the band has not performed on U.S. soil in a dozen years. This tribute took an opportunity to focus on the halcyon days of the band from 1992-1999—a span that encompasses their four most celebrated albums: Emergency on Planet Earth (1993), Return of the Space Cowboy (1995), Travelling Without Moving (1997), and Synkronized (1999). The songwriting and instrumental performances found on these records and the resulting tours are the stuff of legend, and provided a phenomenal roadmap for these virtuosos to explore. Beginning with the electro-disco funk of “Cosmic Girl”, Divinsky assumed the position as Jay Kay and offered his take on the Buffalo Man’s stylish delivery, while the band cranked out the four-on-the-floor groove, setting the proverbial tone for the excursion. On the early material like “Hooked Up”, “Emergency on Planet Earth” and Jamiroquai’s 1992 debut single “When You Gonna Learn?”, the group remained faithful to the aesthetics and arrangements of the originals. Jalbert held things down with quiet storm riddims and choice voicings, while Stoops and Porter were four hands gelling swiftly, comping mightily in honor of the late, great Toby Smith. Few artists can command a stage like Hartswick, and though she was not fronting the band, her presence was felt regularly. She and Cressman added divine elements and a feminine touch that brought a diversity to the vibe and the proceedings.On Space Cowboy’s magnificent “Light Years”, bright pianos stepped to the middle of the mix with authority, while horns took center stage with soaring brass leads and salacious swagger. The captivating conglomerate really found their footing on jams from the gazillion-selling Traveling Without Moving. On “Use the Force”, Brown stepped to the forefront and provided a thrilling trumpet solo, while Werth and Watts got busy underneath a freight train. The colossal “Virtual Insanity” saw the masterful Sayers channel Stuart Zender’s luscious lines with aplomb; all evening, the bassist did the legendary introverted virtuoso proud with nimble fretwork and a tastefully sexy attack. As Divinsky worked the crowd into fits of intoxication, he remarked that the band was nearly out of time, much to the chagrin of the teeming masses that were lapping up the performance. The group then rallied their way into 1999’s “Canned Heat”, a song burned into our hearts and minds forever from its classic placement in the film Napoleon Dynamite. With it’s “nothing left for me to do but DANCE” coda ringing out into the rafters, ’twas a fitting refrain and mantra for this set, for our current cultural climate, and for Brooklyn Comes Alive 2017 as it wound to a conclusion. Tribute To Jamiroquai “Cosmic Girl” 9.24.17 Brooklyn Comes AliveTribute To Jamiroquai “High Times” 9.24.17 Brooklyn Comes AliveTribute To Jamiroquai “Light Years” 9.24.17 Brooklyn Comes AliveTribute To Jamiroquai “Use The Force” 9.24.17 Brooklyn Comes AliveTribute To Jamiroquai “Hooked Up” 9.24.17 Brooklyn Comes AliveTribute To Jamiroquai “Alright” 9.24.17 Brooklyn Comes AliveTribute To Jamiroquai “Virtual Insanity” 9.24.17 Brooklyn Comes AliveTribute To Jamiroquai “Canned Heat” 9.24.17 Brooklyn Comes AliveYou can listen to the full set below, as recorded and mixed by Eric McRoberts:Setlist: Jamiroquai Tribute | Brooklyn Comes Alive | New York City | 9.24.17Cosmic Girl, Too Young To Die, High Times, Light Years, Use The Force *, [email protected], Hooked [email protected], Virtual [email protected], Canned [email protected] To Jamiroquai:Dave Watts – Drums (The Motet)Joey Porter – Keys (The Motet)Garrett Sayers – Bass (The Motet)Ryan Jalbert – Guitar (The Motet)Lyle Divinsky – Vox (The Motet)Todd Stoops – Keys (Electric Beethoven, RAQ)Jennifer Hartswick – Trumpet / Vox (Trey Anastasio Band)Natalie Cressman – Trombone – Vox (Trey Anastasio Band)* w/ Maurice “Mobetta” Brown – [email protected] w/ Nate Werth – Percussion (Snarky Puppy)[Photo: Mark Millman]last_img read more

In the genes, but which ones?

first_imgFor decades, scientists have understood that there is a genetic component to intelligence, but a new Harvard study has found both that most of the genes thought to be linked to the trait are probably not in fact related to it, and identifying intelligence’s specific genetic roots may still be a long way off.Led by David I. Laibson ’88, the Robert I. Goldman Professor of Economics, and Christopher F. Chabris ’88, Ph.D. ’99, assistant professor of psychology at Union College in Schenectady, N.Y., a team of researchers examined a dozen genes using large data sets that included both intelligence testing and genetic data. As reported in a forthcoming article in the journal Psychological Science, they found that in nearly every case, the hypothesized genetic pathway failed to replicate. In other words, intelligence could not be linked to the specific genes that were tested.“It is only in the past 10 or 15 years that we have had the technology for people to do studies that involved picking a particular genetic variant and investigating whether people who score higher on intelligence tests tend to have that genetic variant,” said Chabris. “In all of our tests we only found one gene that appeared to be associated with intelligence, and it was a very small effect. This does not mean intelligence does not have a genetic component, it means it’s a lot harder to find the particular genes, or the particular genetic variants, that influence the differences in intelligence.”Harvard Professor David I. Laibson (pictured) co-led a team of researchers who examined a dozen genes using large data sets that included both intelligence testing and genetic data. File photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerTo get at the question of how genes influence intelligence, researchers first needed data, and plenty of it.Though it had long been understood, based on studies of twins, that intelligence was a heritable trait, it wasn’t until relatively recently that the technology emerged to allow scientists to directly probe DNA in a search for genes that affected intelligence.The problem, Chabris said, was that early technology for assaying genes was very expensive, meaning that such studies were typically limited to, at most, several hundred subjects, who would take IQ tests and provide DNA samples for testing.As part of their study, Chabris and his colleagues relied on several pre-existing data sets — a massive study of Wisconsin high school graduates that began in the 1950s, the Framingham Heart Study, and an ongoing survey of all twins born in Sweden — to expand that subject pool from a few hundred to many thousands.“What we want to emphasize is that we are not saying the people who did earlier research in this area were foolish or wrong,” Chabris said. “They were using the best technology they had available. At the time it was believed that individual genes would have a much larger effect  — they were expecting to find genes that might each account for several IQ points.”To identify genes that might play a role in intelligence, previous researchers used the “candidate gene approach,” which requires identifying a gene that is already linked with a known biological function — such as Alzheimer’s disease or the production of a specific neurotransmitter. If people who scored high on intelligence tests shared a particular variant of that gene, it was believed, that demonstrated the gene’s role in intelligence.“These were reasonable hypotheses,” said study co-author Daniel J. Benjamin ’99, Ph.D. ’06, assistant professor of economics at Cornell University. “But in retrospect, either the findings were false positives or the effects of the genes are much, much smaller than anyone had anticipated.”Chabris, however, emphasized that the results don’t point to the idea that the dozen genes examined in the study play no role in intelligence, but rather suggest that intelligence may be tied to many genes and the ways in which they interact.“As is the case with other traits, like height, there are probably thousands of genes and their variants that are associated with intelligence,” he said. “And there may be other genetic effects beyond the single gene effects – there could be interactions between genes, there could be interactions between genes and the environment. What our results show is that the way researchers have been looking for genes that may be related to intelligence — the candidate gene method — is fairly likely to result in false positives, so other methods should be used.”last_img read more