Act Supports Efforts to Improve Patient Safety

first_imgNew reporting requirements introduced today, May 3, will help make patient care better and safer for Nova Scotians. The Improving Patient Safety and Health System Accountability Act will require district health authorities and the IWK Health Centre to report publicly and to the Department of Health and Wellness on a number of patient safety indicators beginning with the hand hygiene adherence rates. Other indicators, including rates of infections will be added in the future. “This act will support and strengthen our efforts to improve patient safety by providing greater public accountability to the patients who rely on our health-care system for safe care,” said Health and Wellness Minister Maureen MacDonald. “Patient safety is about managing and reducing risks to ensure that the care patients receive is as safe as possible. Hand hygiene adherence rates will be our first priority under the act because it is considered by many experts to be one of the best ways to measure patient safety overall.” Although district health authorities and the IWK monitor and report on many patient safety indicators, they are not always reported publicly or to the Department of Health and Wellness, and may not be reported the same way. The Department of Health and Wellness will work with the districts and the IWK to develop consistent collection methods and reporting processes to ensure information can be compared across the province. The legislation is an important step towards developing a provincial surveillance program that will track and monitor key infection rates and other patient safety indicators. “Our health-care providers are committed to providing the safest care possible to patients. This legislation will let the public know how well we’re performing and allow us to better monitor rates over time, track improvements and develop strategies to address areas of concern,” said Dr. Peter Vaughan, vice president of Medicine for South Shore Health, member of the province’s Quality and Patient Safety Advisory Committee and current chair of Accreditation Canada’s Board of Directors. Nova Scotia is the second province in Canada to take a strong legislated position requiring patient care indicators to be reported publicly. Ontario introduced similar reporting requirements in 2008.last_img read more

UN warns of spike in grave violations against children in Mali as

She added that children should be going to school and playing with their friends, not worrying about avoiding violence or being forced to fight.The Malian Government has been seeking to restore stability and rebuild following a series of setbacks since early 2012 that fractured the country, including a military coup d’état, renewed fighting between Government forces and Tuareg rebels, and the seizure of its northern territory by radical extremists.Concern is rising that while the north has been the main focus of insurrection, central areas of the country, especially around Mopti, are increasingly being embroiled in fighting. According to the UN, so far more than 150 children have been killed in 2019, with 75 injured due to violent attacks. The number of child soldiers in armed groups has doubled comparing to the same period in 2018, and more than 900 schools remain closed due to insecurity.The sharp rise in grave violations has also resulted in a dramatic increase in the need to protect children in the north and the center of Mali. “The needs of Mali’s most vulnerable children are tremendous,” stressed Lucia Elmi, UNICEF Representative in Mali.UNICEF has been working with local authorities to protect more than 377,000 at risk children, along with other UN agencies and partners, to provide medical and psychosocial care for conflict-affected children; support the release and reintegration of children from armed groups; reunite separated children with their families; and provide care for survivors of violence, including sexual violence. The crisis in Mali remains one of the least funded humanitarian operations in the world. In 2019, UNICEF is requesting $4 million to meet child protection needs in the country. “We must not accept the suffering of children as the new normal. All parties must stop attacks on children and take all necessary measures to keep them out of harm’s way, in line with international human rights and humanitarian law,” said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore.Abducted and abused, Sala is one of hundreds of children in Mali suffering extreme violence due to ongoing conflict. #NotATarget #ChildrenUnderAttack pic.twitter.com/STUYQDIZN7— UNICEF (@UNICEF) August 13, 2019 read more